Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

futurescope:

A $50 3D-Printed Prosthesis aka Cyborg Beast compared to a $42,000 Myoelectric Prosthesis

From Jeremy Simon on 3D Universe:

I recently had the opportunity to work with a great guy named Jose Delgado, Jr., a 53-year old who was born without most of his left hand. I made a 3D printed prosthetic hand for Jose and, after using it for a while, I asked him to give me some honest feedback about how it compares to his more expensive myoelectric prosthesis. This is obviously not an “apples to apples” comparison in terms of the devices, but the real value of a prosthesis comes from how useful it is on a day-to-day basis, and that is the focus of the comparison here.

This 3D printed prosthesis is a completely mechanical design. There are a series of non-flexible cords running along the underside of each finger, connecting to a “tensioning block” on the top rear of the device (the “gauntlet”). The tension is caused by bending the wrist downward. With the wrist in its natural resting position, the fingers are extended, with a natural inward curve. When the wrist is bent 20-30 degrees downward, the non-flexible cords are pulled, causing the fingers and thumb to bend inwards. A second series of flexible cords run along the tops of the fingers, causing the fingers to return automatically when tension is released.

3D printers are coming down in price rapidly. As of today, you can get a self-assembly kit starting at around a few hundred dollars, and a fully assembled “prosumer” level printer is going for around $1000-$2000. In other words, this kind of technology is becoming very accessible, and it’s opening up some very exciting possibilities!

A big thanks to the great work of those who contributed to the e-NABLE Hand prosthesis (aka the “Cyborg Beast”), including Jorge Zuniga, Frankie Flood, Ivan Owen, David Orgeman, and others in the e-NABLE community.

[read more] [download the Cyborg Beast]

Posted at 4:43pm.

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Posted at 12:00pm.

The founder of Russia’s most popular social network site says he has been fired and that allies of President Putin have taken over his site.

Pavel Durov who ran VKontakte had previously announced he was leaving the company but said he had withdrawn his resignation.

The company denied it had been withdrawn.

Mr Durov had previously refused requests from the Russian government to censor posts on his site.

In a statement Mr Durov said that he only found out about the loss of his job from press reports: “Today I was fired as general director of VKontakte. It’s interesting that the shareholders didn’t have the bravery to do this directly, and that I learned about my firing from the press.

Posted at 10:26am.

futurescope:

Gecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfaces

The ability to stick objects to a wide range of surfaces such as drywall, wood, metal and glass with a single adhesive has been the elusive goal of many research teams across the world, but now a team inventors describe a new, more versatile version of their invention, Geckskin, that can adhere strongly to a wider range of surfaces, yet releases easily, like a gecko’s feet.

Posted at 8:51am.

futurescope:

Scattered - Marvellous What-If-Scenario

This scifi-short - based on a Ken MacLeod story from the sci-fi anthology TFSF - imagines a world without paper. Well done.

scatteredfilm.com
facebook.com/scatteredfilm
twitter.com/ScatteredFilm

This atmospheric film is the first ever screen-adaptation of the work of award-winning sci-fi author Ken MacLeod. Scattered examines society’s relationship with its past through a son’s relationship with his father, and challenges our established ideas of destruction and terrorism through a crime that is as surprising as it is all-consuming. As all great sci-fi should, Scattered offers a vision of the future that illuminates the present.

After a 15 year wait, Conal is going to meet his father for the first time. His father Keith is the world’s most notorious criminal, convicted of a crime which changed history itself. Convinced of his father’s innocence, Conal needs Keith’s help to set the record straight. But his quest for justice takes an unexpected turn and Conal soon finds himself confronted with the unimaginable.

Ken’s original story, “The Surface of Last Scattering”, was published in an anthology by TRSF, who have kindly permitted us to adapt it for the screen.

Scattered is an official selection of the 2013 Sci-Fi London Film Festival, The Lighthouse Film Festival and Cinema at the Edge.

[via boingboing]

Posted at 7:17am.

analyticisms:

Lots of very interesting trends in this chart.  But beyond the obvious growth and, now, domination of digital media, we can’t help noticing that, within digital media, mobile passed online (call us obsessed with mobile everything).

(Source: marketingcharts.com)

Posted at 5:43am.

analyticisms:

Lots of very interesting trends in this chart.  But beyond the obvious growth and, now, domination of digital media, we can’t help noticing that, within digital media, mobile passed online (call us obsessed with mobile everything).

Ninety percent of the news could be written by computers by 2030.

Software is writing news stories with increasing frequency. In a recent example, an LA Times writer-bot wrote and posted a snippet about an earthquake three minutes after the event. The LA Times claims they were first to publish anything on the quake, and outside the USGS, they probably were.

Full Story: Impact Lab

Posted at 4:09am.

Ninety percent of the news could be written by computers by 2030.

Software is writing news stories with increasing frequency. In a recent example, an LA Times writer-bot wrote and posted a snippet about an earthquake three minutes after the event. The LA Times claims they were first to publish anything on the quake, and outside the USGS, they probably were.

Full Story: Impact Lab

Posted at 2:34am.