Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.
Paul Higgins: Very similar questions should be applied to the Australian government who are talking about “changing  the delicate balance between our safety and our freedoms”
As the Tories launch into their latest ‘human rights are the root of all evil’ fest, at their last annual conference before the next general election, I’d like to ask David Cameron and his party colleagues a question posed by the late Lord Bingham, relating to the rights laid out in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union,
"Which of these rights, I ask, would we wish to discard? Are any of them trivial,
superfluous, unnecessary? Are any them un-British?”Just to be clear which of -
  • Human dignity? (article 1)
  • Right to life? (article 2)
  • Right to the integrity of the person? (article 3)
  • Prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment? (article 4)
  • Prohibition of slavery and forced labour? (article 5)
  • Right to liberty and security? (article 6)
  • Respect for private and family life? (article 7)
  • Protection of personal data? (article 8)
  • Right to marry and right to found a family? (article 9)
  • Freedom of thought, conscience and religion? (article 10)
  • Freedom of expression and information? (article 11)
  • Freedom of assembly and of association? (article 12)
  • Freedom of the arts and sciences? (article 13)
  • Right to education? (article 14)
  • Freedom to choose an occupation and right to engage in work? (article 15)
  • Freedom to conduct a business? (article 16)
  • Right to property? (article 17)
  • Right to asylum? (article 18)
  • Protection in the event of removal, expulsion or extradition? (article 19)
  • Equality before the law? (article 20)
  • Non-discrimination? (article 21)
  • Cultural, religious and linguistic diversity? (article 22)
  • Equality between men and women? (article 23)
  • The rights of the child? (article 24)
  • The rights of the elderly? (article 25)
  • Integration of persons with disabilities? (article 26)
  • Solidarity (articles 27 to 38) 
  • Citizens rights (articles 39 to 46)
  • Right to an effective remedy and to a fair trial? (article 47)
  • Presumption of innocence and right of defence? (article 48)
  • Principles of legality and proportionality of criminal offences and penalties? (article 49)
  • Right not to be tried or punished twice in criminal proceedings for the same criminal offence? (article 50)
  • General provisions (articles 51 to 54)
- would the main party of government wish to discard? Are any of these rights trivial, superfluous, unnecessary? Are any them un-British?”

Posted at 1:34pm.

FedEx’s New Electric Trucks Get a Boost From Diesel Turbines
Jordan Golson, wired.com

FedEx is testing a new powertrain that makes its trucks into electric vehicles with onboard diesel generators.The post FedEx’s New Electric Trucks Get a Boost From Diesel Turbines appeared first on WIRED.

Posted at 12:00pm.


FedEx’s New Electric Trucks Get a Boost From Diesel Turbines Jordan Golson, wired.com
FedEx is testing a new powertrain that makes its trucks into electric vehicles with onboard diesel generators.The post FedEx’s New Electric Trucks Get a Boost From Diesel Turbines appeared first on WIRED.

futurescope:

The Rochester “Invisibility” Cloack

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to hide large objects from sight using inexpensive (less than $100) and readily available lenses.

invisible cloak

Snip from Reuters:

The so-called Rochester Cloak is not really a tangible cloak at all. Rather the device looks like equipment used by an optometrist. When an object is placed behind the layered lenses it seems to disappear.

Previous cloaking methods have been complicated, expensive, and not able to hide objects in three dimensions when viewed at varying angles, they say.

"From what, we know this is the first cloaking device that provides three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking," said Joseph Choi, a graduate student who helped develop the method at Rochester, which is renowned for its optical research.

In their tests, the researchers have cloaked a hand, a face, and a ruler – making each object appear “invisible” while the image behind the hidden object remains in view. The implications for the discovery are endless, they say.

"I imagine this could be used to cloak a trailer on the back of a semi-truck so the driver can see directly behind him," Choi said. "It can be used for surgery, in the military, in interior design, art."

Don’t miss the behind-the-pysics video from University Rochester: How Does Cloaking Work in the Real World?

[read more] [Rochester Quantum Optics Lab]
[Want to make your own? Here’s a tutorial] [picture by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester]

Posted at 10:26am.

tacanderson:

Tech-Friendly Cities Are Battlegrounds for Startups

For companies like Uber and Airbnb, some of the most important fights are being fought in cities that champion new technology.

It’s like Startup Thunderdome! Two startups enter, one startup leaves! 

Posted at 7:17am.

tacanderson:

Tech-Friendly Cities Are Battlegrounds for Startups

For companies like Uber and Airbnb, some of the most important fights are being fought in cities that champion new technology.

It’s like Startup Thunderdome! Two startups enter, one startup leaves! 

mostlysignssomeportents:

NOVA’s Tim De Chant posted this awesome photo of the Kilby Solid Circuit, the first working example of a miniaturized electric circuit that combined all the necessary structures onto a single chip. Back in 2000, when he won the Nobel Prize for this achievement, inventor Jack Kilby gave a really nice talk about the history of electronics and the context that lead to his creation. It’s definitely worth a read.

Read more…

Posted at 4:08am.

mostlysignssomeportents:

Neil Gaiman’s introduction to A Slip of the Keyboard, a collection of Terry Pratchett’s nonfiction essays, exposes a little-known side of the writer than many think of as a “twinkly old elf” — the rage that is Pratchett’s engine, driving him to write deceptively simple stories that decry…

Posted at 2:34am.

mostlysignssomeportents:

Anil Dash has been at it for 15 years (slightly longer than me, but only slightly!) and his reflections on a decade and a half of blogging — through major life changes from marriage to parenthood — really chime with me, especially:

Read more…

Posted at 9:26pm.