Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

How Great Entrepreneurs Think

Sarasvathy concluded that master entrepreneurs rely on what she calls effectual reasoning. Brilliant improvisers, the entrepreneurs don’t start out with concrete goals. Instead, they constantly assess how to use their personal strengths and whatever resources they have at hand to develop goals on the fly, while creatively reacting to contingencies. By contrast, corporate executives—those in the study group were also enormously successful in their chosen field—use causal reasoning. They set a goal and diligently seek the best ways to achieve it.

via @rossdawson

Full Story: Inc

Paul Higgins: There is always a problem about asking people how they make decisions because the responses they give are based on their conscious rational processes. A research process like the one described here goes part way towards avoiding that problem although talking about what they would do in a case study does miss out on the pressures and emotions of living the day to day.

Posted at 11:00am and tagged with: cognitive, decision making, entrepeneurs,.

How Great Entrepreneurs Think

Sarasvathy concluded that master entrepreneurs rely on what she calls effectual reasoning.  Brilliant improvisers, the entrepreneurs don’t start out with concrete  goals. Instead, they constantly assess how to use their personal  strengths and whatever resources they have at hand to develop goals on  the fly, while creatively reacting to contingencies. By contrast,  corporate executives—those in the study group were also enormously  successful in their chosen field—use causal reasoning. They set a goal  and diligently seek the best ways to achieve it.
via @rossdawson
Full Story: Inc
Paul Higgins: There is always a problem about asking people how they make decisions because the responses they give are based on their conscious rational processes. A research process like the one described here goes part way towards avoiding that problem although talking about what they would do in a case study does miss out on the pressures and emotions of living the day to day.
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    Entrepreneurs are Ninjas.
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