Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

Mostly Incoherent Ramblings on Tumblr sent me the following message:

Hey Paul, 

I really enjoy your blog. The idea of futurism really interests me and seeing that you have a masters in the field I was wondering if there were any books on the matter that you would recommend to a bigger looking to get a sense of what futurism is all about. Thanks in advance.
 

 I think that thinking about the future means understanding the past as much as possible and identifying new possibilities while being able to find assumptions and blind spots in thinking that can blind us to those possibilities. Here are a few of my favourites I have pulled off the bookshelf behind me and explanations about why I think they are important. I have posted them over at our long form blog because I think it is too extensive for a Tumblr post:

http://futuristpaul.com/2012/04/13/books-i-like-around-future-thinking-30/

Posted at 10:22am and tagged with: Future, books, strategic thinking,.

Steven Johnson on the future of reading. (via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog)

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: Tech, technology, books, attention,.

Probably the biggest change is going to come from the changed definition of what we’re reading. More and more, texts will evolve the way Wikipedia entries evolve; the idea of a finished text, where all the words have been locked down, will start to seem a little less orthodox—something you’d expect from a novel, but not from a magazine article, say. And that open-endedness will likely mean that the reader is capable of participating, adding links, commenting, suggesting new avenues for exploration, fact-checking. So we’ll have to read in an even more focused way, I suspect, knowing that we can have a say in where the text eventually goes. So there you go: ebooks and digital text are keeping us from skimming and forcing us to engage with the text more directly. Who would have thought it?

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

What does your gut tell you about this statement: “Kids in high school read more books for fun than their parents.”

In fact, it’s true. Young adult reading is up 20% since the last time the survey was done by the Feds, and a recent commercial survey finds the same thing.

Of course, these kids aren’t reading the right books, the books we read, the hard books.

» via The Domino Project

This is exactly why the book as physical product of dead tree are being marginalized. Not, it is not going to disappear anytime soon. It is just being dwarfed by all other ways of distributing stories and knowledge.

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: Books, Attention, Tech, Technology, Disruption,.

Libraries Make Room For High-Tech ‘Hackerspaces’ : NPR

  (via rachelfershleiser)

The problem by this view is that there are many others aiming for that business as well… And when it becomes a business, maybe libraries are not that competitive??

(via futuramb)

(Source: shrinkinglibrarian)

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: libraries, books, disruption, competition,.

We see the library as not being in the book business, but being in the learning business and the exploration business and the expand-your-mind business…
December 09, 2011 at 02:30PM via http://bit.ly/vq3ERH (via stoweboyd)

Posted at 8:20am and tagged with: tech, cognitive, books,.

@WiredFeed: The Future of Context: Mobile Reading from Google to Flipboard to FLUD: Reading is changing. And arguably, even … http://t.co/SAPQ4ZNT

The Future of the Book | IDEO

Paul Higgins: Some really interesting thoughts and concepts here. I was particularly taken by:

  • Nelson - the concept of combining the flow of current thoughts and stories on a subject with a deeper access to material and references.
  • Coupland (or Copeland) - This is an interesting way for people within an organisation to share material and reading. What interested me from a futurist perspective is that it may be a great way to identify blind spots in what an organisation is seeing. As well as showing what is popular, what is well read and what is shared we should be able to highlight what areas are not and use it as a diagnostic tool to improve the forward scanning processes of organisations. 

Posted at 8:40am and tagged with: attention, books, forecast, future, innovation, publishing, tech, technology,.

The printed book, as Seth Godin wrote recently, is a fetish of sorts, like an expensive watch: something we buy because we like to look at it, but something that is no longer really functional or necessary. In the end, that’s likely to be a good thing, not a bad one.

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

A game-changing e-textbook project at Indiana University—in which the university requires certain students to purchase e-textbooks and negotiates unusually low prices by promising publishers large numbers of sales—now has the participation of major textbook publishers, and university officials plan to expand the effort.

Today McGraw-Hill Higher Education announced that it has agreed to join the project, which has been in a pilot stage for more than a year. A handful of other publishers—John Wiley & Sons; Bedford, Freeman & Worth Publishing Group; W.W. Norton; and Flat World Knowledge—have signed on to the effort as well.

Here’s how it works: Students in a select group of courses are required to pay a materials fee, which gets them access to the assigned electronic textbooks or other readings for the course. The university essentially becomes the broker of the textbook sales, and because it is buying in bulk and guaranteeing a high volume, officials say they can score better prices than can the campus bookstore or other retailers.

» via The Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription may be required for some content)

Hmm… so the publishers are using the university organization to blackmail students with a 20% decreased price in order to get them used to e-books and at the same time becoming dependent on the publisher as a provider of e-books?

What Indiana U should see here is that they are in the longer run supporting the publisher’s agenda of permanenting themselves in the educational system, a system which have all the possibilities in the world of transforming education away from traditional dependencies which is just draining and slowing down the knowledge spreading and learning process.

Posted at 6:26am and tagged with: education, higher education, textbooks, ebooks, books, students,.

smarterplanet:

Amazon Kindle can now check out e-books from 11,000 libraries - CSMonitor.com

Kindle users can now check out e-books from 11,000 community libraries across the country, Amazon announced today. The process is a simple one: Navigate to the website of your local library, enter your library card number, select a title, click “Send to Kindle,” and plug in your Amazon.com information. Your book can then be transmitted wirelessly or via USB – any gadget with Amazon software will do, including an iPhone or Android handset.

The availability of the e-books will vary from library to library, but most titles should be available on your Kindle for about two weeks. After that, they’ll disappear. In a press release, Amazon exec Jay Marine called libraries a “critical part of our communities,” and framed the initiative as the natural next step for library lending.

“We’re even doing a little extra here – normally, making margin notes in library books is a big no-no,” Marine said. “But we’re fixing this by extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your notes, highlights and bookmarks are always backed up and available the next time you check out the book or if you decide to buy the book.”

Posted at 6:55am and tagged with: Kindle, books, eReader, ebooks, education, lending, libraries, reading, internet of things,.

smarterplanet:

Amazon Kindle can now check out e-books from 11,000 libraries - CSMonitor.com
Kindle users can now check out e-books from 11,000 community libraries across the country, Amazon announced today. The process is a simple one: Navigate to the website  of your local library, enter your library card number, select a title,  click “Send to Kindle,”  and plug in your Amazon.com information. Your book can then be  transmitted wirelessly or via USB – any gadget with Amazon software will  do, including an iPhone or Android handset.
The availability of the e-books will vary from library to library, but  most titles should be available on your Kindle for about two weeks.  After that, they’ll disappear. In a press release, Amazon exec Jay Marine called libraries a “critical part of our communities,” and framed the initiative as the natural next step for library lending.
“We’re even doing a little extra here – normally, making margin notes in  library books is a big no-no,” Marine said. “But we’re fixing this by  extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your notes, highlights and bookmarks  are always backed up and available the next time you check out the book  or if you decide to buy the book.”

infoneer-pulse:

As reported earlier this year, Amazon and digital content distribution service OverDrive are teaming up to bring Kindle library lending to thousands of public libraries across the U.S. That partnership, rumored to be launching this month, has apparently now gone live in select locations.

According to postings on Amazon’s Kindle Forum, some users are already seeing this option in the Seattle area. A page on Amazon’s website describing the new service has also gone live.

» via TechCrunch

Posted at 6:48pm and tagged with: books, ebooks, libraries, kindle, amazon, seattle,.