Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

smarterplanet:

Chinese team develop fuel cell that can clean water as it generates electricity | Physorg.com

Yanbiao Liu and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, have succeeded in building a device capable of both cleaning wastewater and producing electricity from it. Using light as an energy source the team created a photo-catalytic fuel cell that used a titanium dioxide nanotube-array anode and a cathode based on platinum. The light energy degrades the organic material found in the wastewater and in the process generates electrons which pass through the cathode converting it into electricity. The team has published its results on Water Science & Technology.

Posted at 9:13am and tagged with: water, energy, fuelcell, nanotechnology, China, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

Chinese team develop fuel cell that can clean water as it generates electricity | Physorg.com
Yanbiao Liu and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong  University, have succeeded in building a device capable of both cleaning  wastewater and producing electricity from it. Using light as an energy  source the team created a photo-catalytic fuel cell that used a titanium  dioxide nanotube-array anode and a cathode based on platinum. The light  energy degrades the organic material found in the wastewater and in the  process generates electrons which pass through the cathode converting  it into electricity. The team has published its results on Water Science & Technology.

Only 3% Of What You Buy Is Made In China, But It’s The Most Important 3%


USA: When we outsourced manufacturing to China and Japan and Taiwan, we may have lost something far more important than low-wage jobs. We may have lost the ability to innovate and grow.

Full Story: FastCompany

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: economic, innovation, China, USA,.

Only 3% Of What You Buy Is Made In China, But It’s The Most Important 3%


USA: When we outsourced manufacturing to China and Japan and Taiwan, we may have lost something far more important than low-wage jobs. We may have lost the ability to innovate and grow.

Full Story: FastCompany

futuramb:

Graduate schools saw a 21% increase in Chinese applicants from the last school year and a 23% increase in admissions offers, for students slated to start this fall, according to a study by the Council of Graduate Schools. It is the sixth year in a row of double-digit percentage increases for Chinese students.
(via Chinese Students Flood U.S. Grad Schools - WSJ.com)

Posted at 8:23pm and tagged with: China, education, trends,.

futuramb:

Graduate schools saw a 21% increase in Chinese applicants from the last school year and a 23% increase in admissions offers, for students slated to start this fall, according to a study by the Council of Graduate Schools. It is the sixth year in a row of double-digit percentage increases for Chinese students.
(via Chinese Students Flood U.S. Grad Schools - WSJ.com)

smarterplanet:

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao’s proposal of the “Sensing China” strategy in August 2009 has triggered the development of “sensory cities” around the country. Along with the development of new-generation information technologies including the Internet of things and cloud computing, the development of sensory cities also focuses on the application of new technologies in key fields including urban management, environmental protection, health care and urban traffic.
 In the health care field, the informatization of such sectors as public health, medical services, medical security, drug and food and health administration will help achieve the efficient, accurate and interactive collection and transmission of health care information, intelligentize the health care management and accelerate the development of the health care system.

The specific tasks include the regional health records-based health care platform, electronic medical records, public health emergency command and intelligent decision-making system, health supervision and mobile enforcement system, medical supplies tracing and quality monitoring system, as well as wireless all-in-one smart hospital.

The sensory cities focusing on health care applications will be: Beijing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Suzhou, Wuxi, Yangzhou, Zhenjiang, Wenzhou, Fuzhou, Xiamen, Zibo, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Kunming.

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: China, Wenzhou, cities, cloud, internet of things, sensory cities, tech, technology,.

Paul Higgins: Well if you borrow money from people they have some rights over what happens. The Chinese who actually lent the money should be listened to far more than the ratings agencies who screwed up in the run up to the GFC!

climateadaptation:

Holy moly. What is going on??

“China, the largest creditor of the world’s sole superpower, has every right now to demand the United States to address its structural debt problems and ensure the safety of China’s dollar assets,” it said.

Xinhua said the U.S. must slash its “gigantic military expenditure and bloated social welfare costs” and accept international supervision over U.S. dollar issues.

(Source: fertilizermarkets)

Posted at 7:35am and tagged with: economic, China, USA, politics,.

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: climate change, environment, China,.

Surging China costs turn some U.S. makers homeward


A variety of factors are driving the shift, including rising wages in parts of Asia, surging fuel prices and the complexity of transporting goods across the Pacific.

Full Story: Reuters


Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: China, eceonomic, trends, manufacturing,.

Surging China costs turn some U.S. makers homeward


A variety of factors are driving the shift, including rising wages in parts of Asia, surging fuel prices and the complexity of transporting goods across the Pacific.
Full Story: Reuters

Why Every Maker Should Learn Chinese

Paul Higgins: An interesting post on the economic power of China plus some tools you can use for learning language. Including Memrise which we have featured here before.

Full Story: Make Magazine

Posted at 4:43am and tagged with: economic, China, manufacturing,.

Why Every Maker Should Learn Chinese
Paul Higgins: An interesting post on the economic power of China plus some tools you can use for learning language. Including Memrise which we have featured here before.
Full Story: Make Magazine

climateadaptation:

Heads up! China just surpassed the United States as the world’s leading manufacture. But as Dateline/au shows, empty cities dot the landscape. Thousands of ancient homes are being scraped of the landscape and millions of people are being quietly relocated to make room for, essentially, empty skycrapers.

The famously disastrous Mall of China is profiled. So is one new city, which was expected to hold 12,000,000 people. In fact, it’s estimated that the vacancy rate in China far exceeds any other country’s, at any other time. A low-ball 64 million new apartments are estimated to be empty, with essentially no one interested or able to afford to buy one. Still, despite the media’s portrayal of a dire economic bubble, I think the situation is temporary and China will fill those homes, regardless of cost.

(Source: thetangentleman)

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: China, economic, risk,.

climateadaptation:

theatlantic:

Why China’s Ghost Towns Matter For the World Economy

It’s no surprise that the global recovery is facing a new round of setbacks, as the IMF reported in a new report issued today. But after high food prices, slow growth, and heavy debt, there’s another potential force emerging that could block the global recovery. 

This one starts with metal. Too much, as it’s turning out. China’s property market is showing signs of rusting. Home buys in major cities are slowing down. Construction outside the megatrapolises has infamously produced dozens of “ghost” towns that are actually more like stillborn cities, because they were designed for residents that never materialized

The People’s Bank of China has raised interest rates four times in the last two years and raised bank deposit requirements 11 times since January 2010, reports Caixin, a Chinese business magazine. This will slow down investment and make it more difficult for the country’s emerging middle class to move out to these theoretical cities. Few analysts are anticipating a full-scale meltdown of the Chinese housing market. But even a moderate dip reverberates.

Read more at The Atlantic

Wrong! The Atlantic gets Chinese growth wrong. The author barely whispers of a connection to the global economy to these handful of empty cities, and to thread interest rates and CPI together based on one IMF report - without question - is just poor reporting. For example, it’s disingenuous to say that the People’s Bank of China raised interest rates four times in the past year without providing context. In 2008, the rate was 5.58%. It’s currently at 6.31%. Big f’n whoop, Atlantic.

How quickly the Atlantic forgets that China just implemented it’s 11th five-year plan, which focuses on slowing growth. So of course they raised interest rates - they announced it months ago, and have been planning it for years.

As for housing bubbles, the Chinese do not have a history of mortgaging property - it’s brand new concept to 100s of millions of people. For the Chinese that do know, they’ve overpriced certain markets vis a vis speculation. But, to say that these regional effects are suddenly impacting global markets belies the fact that the markets were sans such ‘influence’ less then a decade ago! 

Why so much deference to the IMF?? Is the Atlantic a PR firm?? Do some reporting, or at least use google. The rural Chinese aren’t moving to these cities because there isn’t the infrastructure to bring people in. Rural residents barely know these new cities exist. Nor do they have incentive to move to them compared to existing cities, which are thousands of years old, are proven centers of economic stability, and are highly likely to contain family, friends, and other contacts - not to mention well developed routes to get there. New highways to these new cities are just that - new, nothing more. Why expect the poor to instantly be able to purchase a home, or even be interested in it? Certainly not just because they were built. So, yeah, of course they’re empty. The Atlantic can do better than regurgitate reports by the IMF. 

As for high food prices, China’s CPI is relatively and historically pretty low. It’s especially low considering such explosive growth. Does the Atlantic have a better idea as to where it should be considering this type of growth? Yes, it should be way higher, and way more out of control. But it’s not. It’s pretty darn stable. And the Chinese are aggressively regulating and tamping down prices (not to mention purchasing irrigable land in Africa). Further, China is extremely lucky that CPI hasn’t completely exploded due to several several extreme natural disasters impacting the agricultural sector. 

Agreed, China’s empty new cities are a problem. But they’re not a global problem. They’re a regional problem with respect the provinces and to report it as such is not cool. (And don’t get me started on regional corruption!). The Atlantic should stop exciting its readers with fluff pieces like this. 

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: China, economic,.

climateadaptation:

theatlantic:

Why China’s Ghost Towns Matter For the World Economy

It’s no surprise that the global recovery is facing a new round of setbacks, as the IMF reported in a new report issued today. But after high food prices, slow growth, and heavy debt, there’s another potential force emerging that could block the global recovery. 
This one starts with metal. Too much, as it’s turning out. China’s property market is showing signs of rusting. Home buys in major cities are slowing down. Construction outside the megatrapolises has infamously produced dozens of “ghost” towns that are actually more like stillborn cities, because they were designed for residents that never materialized
The People’s Bank of China has raised interest rates four times in the last two years and raised bank deposit requirements 11 times since January 2010, reports Caixin, a Chinese business magazine. This will slow down investment and make it more difficult for the country’s emerging middle class to move out to these theoretical cities. Few analysts are anticipating a full-scale meltdown of the Chinese housing market. But even a moderate dip reverberates.

Read more at The Atlantic

Wrong! The Atlantic gets Chinese growth wrong. The author barely whispers of a connection to the global economy to these handful of empty cities, and to thread interest rates and CPI together based on one IMF report - without question - is just poor reporting. For example, it’s disingenuous to say that the People’s Bank of China raised interest rates four times in the past year without providing context. In 2008, the rate was 5.58%. It’s currently at 6.31%. Big f’n whoop, Atlantic.
How quickly the Atlantic forgets that China just implemented it’s 11th five-year plan, which focuses on slowing growth. So of course they raised interest rates - they announced it months ago, and have been planning it for years.
As for housing bubbles, the Chinese do not have a history of mortgaging property - it’s brand new concept to 100s of millions of people. For the Chinese that do know, they’ve overpriced certain markets vis a vis speculation. But, to say that these regional effects are suddenly impacting global markets belies the fact that the markets were sans such ‘influence’ less then a decade ago! 
Why so much deference to the IMF?? Is the Atlantic a PR firm?? Do some reporting, or at least use google. The rural Chinese aren’t moving to these cities because there isn’t the infrastructure to bring people in. Rural residents barely know these new cities exist. Nor do they have incentive to move to them compared to existing cities, which are thousands of years old, are proven centers of economic stability, and are highly likely to contain family, friends, and other contacts - not to mention well developed routes to get there. New highways to these new cities are just that - new, nothing more. Why expect the poor to instantly be able to purchase a home, or even be interested in it? Certainly not just because they were built. So, yeah, of course they’re empty. The Atlantic can do better than regurgitate reports by the IMF. 

As for high food prices, China’s CPI is relatively and historically pretty low. It’s especially low considering such explosive growth. Does the Atlantic have a better idea as to where it should be considering this type of growth? Yes, it should be way higher, and way more out of control. But it’s not. It’s pretty darn stable. And the Chinese are aggressively regulating and tamping down prices (not to mention purchasing irrigable land in Africa). Further, China is extremely lucky that CPI hasn’t completely exploded due to several several extreme natural disasters impacting the agricultural sector. 
Agreed, China’s empty new cities are a problem. But they’re not a global problem. They’re a regional problem with respect the provinces and to report it as such is not cool. (And don’t get me started on regional corruption!). The Atlantic should stop exciting its readers with fluff pieces like this.