Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.
On how important social media has become, Karp shared that the bulk of traffic that Tumblr sees comes from Twitter and Facebook. Not Google. This isn’t surprising, but speaks volumes about the real-time value of Tumblr. While most blogs rely on Google for the bulk of its traffic, Tumblr has carved itself a niche that is a hybrid between real-time and static content. Basically, the company has built the best of both worlds.

Posted at 6:31am and tagged with: search, tech, technology,.

Google says that its search engine now contains 500 million objects and knows more than 3.5 billion facts ‘and relationships between these different objects.’

searchengineland:

Analyst firm BIA/Kelsey has projected that by 2015 there will be more local searches coming from smartphones than PCs in the US.

Posted at 2:50am and tagged with: trends, mobile, search, technology, tech,.

searchengineland:

Analyst firm BIA/Kelsey has projected that by 2015 there will be more local searches coming from smartphones than PCs in the US.

searchengineland:

Google Grows Revenues 24% From Last Year, Plans New Class Of Stock

Google’s revenues rose to $10.65 billion in the first quarter of 2012, resulting in net income of $2.89 billion, or $8.75 per share, the company announced after market close today. The revenue number represents a 24% increase over the year-ago period. Additionally, the board of directors proposed the creation of a new class of non-voting shares — to be distributed as a dividend to all current shareholders — effectively resulting in an two for one stock split.

“We had a very strong quarter,” said CEO Larry Page on a conference call with press and analysts, “Since becoming CEO again, I have pushed hard to focus on the big bets.”

Page described the creation of a new class of stock as enabling the founders to keep corporate decision-making amongst a small group, allowing the company to continue to take a longer-term view on the business. Though Page and Sergey Brin, in a 2012 founders’ letter, say they know some won’t be happy about the decision, “…after careful consideration with our board of directors, we have decided that maintaining this founder-led approach is in the best interests of Google, our shareholders and our users. Having the flexibility to use stock without diluting our structure will help ensure we are set up for success for decades to come.”

The decision begs speculation about what Google may be planning to do with its stock — acquisitions, perhaps? — that it wants to do without granting voting rights. But, in the letter, the founders address this, saying: “we don’t have an unusually big acquisition planned, in case you were wondering.”

Posted at 10:10am and tagged with: search, economic, trends, tech, technology,.

searchengineland:

Google Grows Revenues 24% From Last Year, Plans New Class Of Stock
Google’s revenues rose to $10.65 billion in the first quarter of 2012, resulting in net income of $2.89 billion, or $8.75 per share, the company announced after market close today. The revenue number represents a 24% increase over the year-ago period. Additionally, the board of directors proposed the creation of a new class of non-voting shares — to be distributed as a dividend to all current shareholders — effectively resulting in an two for one stock split.
“We had a very strong quarter,” said CEO Larry Page on a conference call with press and analysts, “Since becoming CEO again, I have pushed hard to focus on the big bets.”
Page described the creation of a new class of stock as enabling the founders to keep corporate decision-making amongst a small group, allowing the company to continue to take a longer-term view on the business. Though Page and Sergey Brin, in a 2012 founders’ letter, say they know some won’t be happy about the decision, “…after careful consideration with our board of directors, we have decided that maintaining this founder-led approach is in the best interests of Google, our shareholders and our users. Having the flexibility to use stock without diluting our structure will help ensure we are set up for success for decades to come.”
The decision begs speculation about what Google may be planning to do with its stock — acquisitions, perhaps? — that it wants to do without granting voting rights. But, in the letter, the founders address this, saying: “we don’t have an unusually big acquisition planned, in case you were wondering.”

searchengineland:

Reports: Google CPCs Continue To Decline And Yahoo/Bing’s Rise While Spend Overall Grows In Q1

Recently released reports by Efficient Frontier, RKG and Covario give insight into how paid search did in the last quarter, and predict what spending might look like for the rest of the year to come.

Posted at 2:49am and tagged with: tech, technology, internet, search, trends,.

searchengineland:

While the SEO industry has spent years decrying how well Wikipedia seems to dominate Google’s rankings, it may be that Amazon.com is the real king of visibility.

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: tech, technology, trends, search,.

searchengineland:

While the SEO industry has spent years decrying how well Wikipedia seems to dominate Google’s rankings, it may be that Amazon.com is the real king of visibility.

thenextweb:

The chart, produced by China-based SEO and Web design agency Them [via Resonance China], serves up a batch of impressive statistics and facts relating to the country’s ecommerce, search and social media spaces – each of which is dominated by strong local players. (via Ecommerce, Search and Social Media in China by the Numbers)

Posted at 3:48pm and tagged with: search, social media, China, tech, technology,.

thenextweb:

The chart, produced by China-based SEO and Web design agency Them [via Resonance China], serves up a batch of impressive statistics and facts relating to the country’s ecommerce, search and social media spaces – each of which is dominated by strong local players. (via Ecommerce, Search and Social Media in China by the Numbers)

- John Battelle, Search, Plus Your World, As Long As It’s Our World

Once again, Google steps in a pile of doodoo with its maladroit efforts in trying to absorb the social web. Unwilling to simply index things and offer them up as search results, Google wants to ‘socialize’ search. What this means is that search is just another battlefield for Google to fight the war for the future against Facebook, Twitter, etc.

On one hand, you have to admit that Google faces a new world, one that is increasingly social, and the search company has to get in there. But this is not the way to do it.

I continue to be amazed that Google doesn’t look at its email and calendar apps as a good place to build social, instead of dicking around with search.

(via stoweboyd)

Posted at 6:44am and tagged with: Search, Social media, Tech, Technology,.

The unwillingness of Facebook and Google to share a public commons when it comes to the intersection of search and social is corrosive to the connective tissue of our shared culture. But as with all things Internet, we’ll just identify the damage and route around it. It’s just too bad we have to do that, and in the long run, it’s bad for Facebook, bad for Google, and bad for all of us. (BTW, Google also doesn’t show Twitter or Flickr results either, or any other “social” service. Just its own, Google and Picasa.)

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

Your Physician Is Googling Your Symptoms Too

You aren’t the only one using search engines to diagnose your symptoms when you get sick (or have a bout of hypochondria).  The Wolters Kluwer Health survey asked members of the American Medical Association a simple question: “How often would you use the following sources [professional journals, colleagues, medical reference books, search engines, etc.] to gain information used to diagnose, treat and care for patients?”  It turns out that only professional journals and colleagues outrank search engines, and 46 percent of physicians cite Google and its ilk as frequent sources of information.

» via The Atlantic

I wonder how true these numbers are… If we are adding the factor that it is e g perceived as “unprofessional” to google something and therefore most likely is biasing the answers, the reference to professional journals are probably lower and googling and “medical/drug sales reps” remarkably higher.  

Another aspect is that google very often hold references to both professional journals and blogs of colleagues. And colleagues might have acquired their knowledge from surfing the web…

But even without these adjustments the number are really interesting and a consequence of this is that patients and physicians probably should google their symptoms together rather then separate of each other…

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: Health, Search, Technology,.

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

Your Physician Is Googling Your Symptoms Too

You aren’t the only one using search engines to diagnose your symptoms when you get sick (or have a bout of hypochondria).  The Wolters Kluwer Health survey asked members of the American Medical Association a simple question: “How often would you use the following sources [professional journals, colleagues, medical reference books, search engines, etc.] to gain information used to diagnose, treat and care for patients?”  It turns out that only professional journals and colleagues outrank search engines, and 46 percent of physicians cite Google and its ilk as frequent sources of information.

» via The Atlantic

I wonder how true these numbers are… If we are adding the factor that it is e g perceived as “unprofessional” to google something and therefore most likely is biasing the answers, the reference to professional journals are probably lower and googling and “medical/drug sales reps” remarkably higher.  
Another aspect is that google very often hold references to both professional journals and blogs of colleagues. And colleagues might have acquired their knowledge from surfing the web…
But even without these adjustments the number are really interesting and a consequence of this is that patients and physicians probably should google their symptoms together rather then separate of each other…