Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

stoweboyd:

Hill Holliday and SecondScreen Networks set up a study to find out how they might sunchronize the head shifting that goes along with the ‘swarm of devices’ style of TV use that goes on these days, given the emergence of the second screen:

Ilya Vedrashko, Smartphones Distract People Away from…

Posted at 7:19pm and tagged with: attention, technology, advertising, tech,.

What GM’s retreat really shows is the harsh reality that other brands must face: Making social-media communications work requires heavier lift than many organizations can muster.

Facebook makes about 1/10th of Google’s revenues even though they have 2x the pageviews. Some estimates put Google’s search revenues per pageviews at 100-200x Facebook’s.

…The bad news is that, if there is one consistent theme in both online and offline advertising, it’s that ads work dramatically better when consumers have purchasing intent. Google makes the vast majority of their revenues when people search for something to buy or hire. They don’t have to stoke demand – they simply harvest it. When people use Facebook, they are generally socializing with friends. You can put billboards all over a park, and maybe sometimes you’ll happen to convert people from non-purchasing to purchasing intents. But you end up with a cluttered park, and not very effective advertising.

(via Chris Dixon)

Posted at 7:14pm and tagged with: economic, tech, technology, business models, social media, advertising,.

Dramatically more information, and limited processing capacity, means that anyone in the game of grabbing attention, and disruption is in a race to the bottom. The web is destroying disruption as an effective and efficient advertising mechanism. Disruption is a terrible user experience and is damaging to both the publisher and advertiser.

stoweboyd:

TV advertising is up, but it’s a Ponzi scheme, like the increased revenue in movie theaters: in both cases, they are losing viewers but charging more.

David Carr via NYTimes.com

According to estimates reported by Reuters, in the coming week the big four broadcast networks and the CW will book some $9 billion in advertising revenue, with the big four up 2 to 4 percent from last year. And cable networks, which surpassed broadcasters for the first time last year in total advertising booked during the upfronts, are expecting a payday of more than $9.6 billion, an increase of 4 to 6 percent.

Part of what keeps legacy television in the game is that it is the last refuge of mass and reach. For retailers who want to flag a sale or an entertainment company with a weekend movie opening, a commercial on a broadcast network or a highly rated cable station can still hammer a message into a lot of noggins. In this targeted age, it’s breathtakingly inefficient — you pay to reach everyone, even the millions not in the desired age group — but making a big television buy is a kind of comfort food, easy and familiar.

Yet by losing audience, networks and cable stations have been able to force advertisers to buy more commercials to reach the number of viewers that they want.

“They have an interesting business model predicated on losing viewers,” observed Brad Adgate, the senior vice president for research at Horizon Media. “It can’t last forever.”

At some point, the laws of both gravity and economics will begin to pull down the upfronts, and with them, the fundamentals of the television business. Jeff Gaspin, who used to head entertainment at NBC, told Bill Carter that he and his son recently decided to catch up on a particular series and so assembled episodes from a variety of sources — iTunes, Netflix and the DVR. They saw all the past episodes in time to watch the final one live on AMC but found that commercials interrupted their experience.

So what show demonstrated to the former television executive that the old way of watching television was losing relevance?

“The Walking Dead.”

Posted at 6:30am and tagged with: disruption, advertising, economic, tech, technology, attention,.

Five-year-old Tumblr has raised $125 million in financing, $85 million of which came last fall. In the last year, the site has exploded. There are now 53 million blogs on Tumblr, with a total of about 17 billion global monthly page views. The company has gone from fewer than 20 employees in 2010 to more than 100 now. They are building an editorial product, staffed by veterans of BlackBook and Newsweek, that will cover happenings inside the Tumblr community. Major brands are increasingly establishing a presence on the site, as are celebrities, media outlets, your friends, and their pets. The Tumblr terrarium is vast and increasingly self-contained: you could never leave the site and still live a pretty full creative and commercial life online.

courtenaybird:

With a reach approaching 15 percent of the world’s population, Facebook is a thriving media business. In the last quarter alone, it raked in more $1 billion in revenue, almost entirely from advertising.

But to hear some people at big ad agencies talk, it could be a whole lot more.

…The company has become a victim of its own success. It’s automating its process and using technology to increase efficiency. But that’s not the same as dealing with a human being; big advertisers are a needy bunch who want hand-holding. However, plenty say they can’t even find anyone at Facebook to take their calls — or their money.

“We know the reach is there. The problem is that Facebook isn’t willing to do anything different for the client that wants to spend $10,000 versus $10 million.”

via CNET

Posted at 8:21am and tagged with: economic, business models, tech, technology, advertising, Social media,.

courtenaybird:

Stats: Facebook Made $9.51 in Ad Revenue Per User Last Year In The U.S. and Canada 

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg “also added that advertising budgets are not moving online fast enough to match user behavior. Of the roughly $600 billion spent on advertising every year, only 11 percent of it is devoted toward online ads. Another $1.5 billion in advertising is spent on mobile devices.”

Posted at 4:41am and tagged with: social media, tech, technology, advertising,.

courtenaybird:

Stats: Facebook Made $9.51 in Ad Revenue Per User Last Year In The U.S. and Canada 
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg “also added that advertising budgets are not moving online fast enough to match user behavior. Of the roughly $600 billion spent on advertising every year, only 11 percent of it is devoted toward online ads. Another $1.5 billion in advertising is spent on mobile devices.”

courtenaybird:

Consumer Trust in Online, Social and Mobile Advertising Grows | Nielsen Wire

When it comes to traditional, paid media, while nearly half of consumers around the world say they trust television (47%), magazine (47%) and newspaper ads (46%), confidence declined by 24 percent, 20 percent and 25 percent, respectively, between 2009 and 2011.

Posted at 4:40am and tagged with: trust, advertising, tech, technology, mobile,.

courtenaybird:

Consumer Trust in Online, Social and Mobile Advertising Grows | Nielsen Wire
When it comes to traditional, paid media, while nearly half of consumers around the world say they trust television (47%), magazine (47%) and newspaper ads (46%), confidence declined by 24 percent, 20 percent and 25 percent, respectively, between 2009 and 2011.