Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

Ars Technica tries a new way to monetize a much-anticipated article with a Kindle ebook for Mac fans

“It’s the same review that you get for free on Ars. You don’t have to pay for it,” Fisher said. But people have: The ebook sold 3,000 copies in the first 24 hours, Fisher said. 

Full Story: Nieman

Posted at 1:22pm and tagged with: ebooks, disruption, business model,.


Ars Technica tries a new way to monetize a much-anticipated article with a Kindle ebook for Mac fans



“It’s the same review that you get for free on Ars. You don’t have to pay for it,” Fisher said. But people have: The ebook sold 3,000 copies in the first 24 hours, Fisher said. 

Full Story: Nieman

stoweboyd:

Kara Swisher reports on a soon-to-be-transacted funding for Twitter based on an $8B valuation, raising $800M, with $400M to be used to cash out employees and earlier investors.

Kara Swisher

This is more than double what Twitter was valued at when it got $200 million in venture funding from Kleiner Perkins in December at a $3.7 billion valuation.

Once the latest investments are complete, Twitter’s total cash haul since it was founded five years ago will be $760 million.

[…]

The latest funding is an important one for Twitter and will up the pressure for its management, including CEO Dick Costolo, to really get its business growing in terms of revenue and profits.

Twitter is still struggling with coming up with a truly lucrative business model, and its execs have presented a number of them, such as promoted tweets, largely based on advertising.

I wonder if Costolo has looked into the enterprise side of things, and I don’t mean social media. I mean work media: helping businesses coordinate, communicate, cooperate, and collaborate internally, and with partners and customers?

It’s a large and growing market, with competitors like Jive, IBM, Yammer, and Podio, but Twitter has huge advantages, and could move aggressively.

Posted at 7:10am and tagged with: social media, tech, technology, work, economic, business model,.

futuramb:

Open access services are thriving, however; they just aren’t thriving in libraries. BioMed Central, a commercial venture, created an author-pays model for open access that has now been widely imitated. BMC, of course, was subsequently acquired by Springer, among the largest publishers of scientific research. The Public Library of Science has established a highly regarded open access service, and they have done it entirely outside of libraries. Now PLoS has attracted many imitators: Wiley Blackwell, BMJ, and, in the social sciences, SAGE. Most intriguing is an open access service from AIP, which seems likely to create competition for the library-sponsored physics arXiv at Cornell. What we have seen with open access publishing is that publishers, rather than being disintermediated, are learning how to coopt it. With open access publishing, libraries have succeeded in disintermediating themselves.

In the book world, there are signs that publishers are indeed being disintermediated; the question is how exceptional are these instances of disintermediation. An established mystery writer named Joe Konrath decided to move his books over to Amazon’s self-publishing service because of the promise of earning higher royalties. I doubt that there is a trade publisher in the world who has not been following Konrath’s career closely, praying that he will fail. Even more fascinating is the case of a young woman named Amanda Hocking, who came to self-publishing with no prior publishing experience. Her young adult novels earned her a small fortune, attracting the interest of major commercial publishers, one of which has now signed up Hocking to a million-dollar contract. One emerging pattern seems to be that publishers are initially threatened with disintermediation, whether through open access or self-publishing services, and then find a way to reinsert themselves into the value chain. Having a big checkbook helps.

Interesting and pretty nuanced article about what is happening in the book value chain. Well worth reading!

(I have a million comments about this but this is just Tumblr… right?)

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: disruption, libraries, tech, technology, busin, business model,.

bijan:

Apple’s primary business is selling computing devices and related hardware, with healthy margins and tightly integrated experiences, to customers who generally replace them with the newest models every 1-3 years.

Marco believes that Apple is going to stay out of the tv business.

I have no idea if Apple will ship a hdtv.

But i do feel like the status quo needs disruption given all the ads we don’t watch, poor UI’s on set tops, forced bundling of content, dated content windows models, displays that are uninspired, tv that doesnt’ take advantage of the web or social data or experiences, nasty remote controls, confusing wiring and set up….the list goes on.

Someone needs to step up and make a change. 

Posted at 5:57am and tagged with: TV, disruption, Apple, business model, economic, tech, technology,.

infoneer-pulse:

“Our business model is built on all kinds of assumptions that don’t hold anymore,” said Richard Holmgren, associate dean and CIO at Allegheny College. “Over the last 40 years of the last century, we built a model based on the assumption that net revenues per student would go up every year.…We have a culture built on that assumption,” Holmgren said. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve been struggling because net revenues have been flat.”

None of the participants in the daylong business-model workshop that followed seemed to dispute the basic premise that liberal arts programs are plagued by twin threats of inertia and economic unsustainability. To make matters even more grim, one self-described envoy of “the corporate world” — Kit Stinson, a vice president at the telecommunication giant Avaya — spoke up early on in the conference to testify against the truism that liberal arts graduates make for more creative and critical-thinking workers, setting off a parallel discussion about whether today’s incarnation of liberal education, sacrosanct to many, actually increases students’ employability outside academe.

» via Inside Higher Ed

Posted at 9:04pm and tagged with: education, economic, business model,.

Free Kindle This November

In October 2009 John Walkenbach noticed that the price of the Kindle was falling at a consistent rate, lowering almost on a schedule. By June 2010, the rate was so unwavering that he could easily forecast the date at which the Kindle would be free: November 2011.

Full Story: Kevin Kelly

Posted at 4:09am and tagged with: economic, business model, ebooks, forecasts,.

Free Kindle This November

In October 2009 John Walkenbach noticed that the price of the Kindle  was falling at a consistent rate, lowering almost on a schedule. By  June 2010, the rate was so unwavering that he could easily forecast the  date at which the Kindle would be free: November 2011.
Full Story: Kevin Kelly

A New Model for Film Music

In an unconventional deal that may promise a revival in film music, the Cutting Edge Group, based in London, and its chief executive, Philip Moross, effectively bought the musical portion of “The King’s Speech” months ago

Posted at 4:09am and tagged with: innovation, business model,.

A New Model for Film Music

In an unconventional deal that may promise a revival in film music, the Cutting Edge Group,  based in London, and its chief executive, Philip Moross, effectively  bought the musical portion of “The King’s Speech” months ago

Harvard grads turn gym business model on its head

Gym-Pact offers what Zhang calls motivational fees — customers agree to pay more if they miss their scheduled workouts, literally buying into a financial penalty if they don’t stick to their fitness plans. The concept arose from Zhang’s behavioral economics class at Harvard, where professor Sendhil Mullainathan taught that people are more motivated by immediate consequences than by future possibilities.

Posted at 10:26am and tagged with: innovation, business model, behavioural economics,.

Harvard grads turn gym business model on its head

Gym-Pact offers what Zhang calls motivational fees — customers agree to  pay more if they miss their scheduled workouts, literally buying into a  financial penalty if they don’t stick to their fitness plans. The  concept arose from Zhang’s behavioral economics class at Harvard, where  professor Sendhil Mullainathan taught that people are more motivated by  immediate consequences than by future possibilities.