Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.
J P Rangaswami, Thinking about change (via stoweboyd)

Posted at 7:52pm and tagged with: mobile, cloud, cloud computing, tech, change,.

The cloud is not just about flexibility of access to compute power and storage and bandwidth, or about avoiding the thankless tasks of software installations, maintenance and upgrades; mobile is not just about ubiquity of access; cloud and mobile, together, are not just about the ability to “shift time” and “shift space”; social is not just about getting closer to the customer, about valuing relationships and capabilities; open is not just about the transformation of innovation, about partnering, about collaboration across boundaries.

The cloud paradigm is about all of this.

And about one more thing.

The capacity to change. Designed as an integral function. Native.

Changing capacity, scale, coverage, product set, devices, whatever. The cloud is about launching products, scaling them up, scaling them down, discontinuing them. The cloud is about entering …. and exiting … markets. The cloud is about delivering services to the device of choice; even if it didn’t exist when the original design was made.

The cloud is about change. Not about the steady state.

IT before the cloud was all about preserving and maintaining the steady state. And that’s why so many projects failed, and will continue to fail. A conflict of philosophy, as the agents of change try to batter down the walls of the mechanisms implemented to protect against change.

The monolithic systems of the past, largely concentrated on the back office, were built to achieve entirely different objectives: stable, repeatable processes executed at the lowest cost possible, designed to rebuff change.

The cloud is about change.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Paul Higgins: I am sure it won’t be the last

digiphile:

smarterplanet:

In April, Radar reported that Energy.gov was moving to Drupal. This morning, the Energy Department launched a redesigned Energy.gov as an interactive open platform that enables information exchange, open data and localized information for citizens. The new Energy.gov uses a combination of open source technology and cloud computing will save an estimated $10 million dollars annually, according to Energy Department officials.

“Our goal is to make Energy.gov easier to use, more transparent and more participatory,” said Secretary of Energy Steven Chu in a prepared statement. “This next phase is part of our ongoing commitment to empower consumers and businesses with the information, tools and services they need to save money, create jobs and find opportunities in the new energy economy.”

The new Energy.gov is built using Drupal 7, the same open source content management system used at WhiteHouse.gov, Commerce.gov, House.gov, and it’s the system that supported the reboot of FCC.gov as an open government platform. Drupal distributions are now supporting a growing number of open government platforms in local, state and federal government.

First time I found one of my stories shared on Tumblr! I hope it isn’t the last. :)

Posted at 12:48pm and tagged with: cloud, energy, government, tech, technology, open source,.

smarterplanet:

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao’s proposal of the “Sensing China” strategy in August 2009 has triggered the development of “sensory cities” around the country. Along with the development of new-generation information technologies including the Internet of things and cloud computing, the development of sensory cities also focuses on the application of new technologies in key fields including urban management, environmental protection, health care and urban traffic.
 In the health care field, the informatization of such sectors as public health, medical services, medical security, drug and food and health administration will help achieve the efficient, accurate and interactive collection and transmission of health care information, intelligentize the health care management and accelerate the development of the health care system.

The specific tasks include the regional health records-based health care platform, electronic medical records, public health emergency command and intelligent decision-making system, health supervision and mobile enforcement system, medical supplies tracing and quality monitoring system, as well as wireless all-in-one smart hospital.

The sensory cities focusing on health care applications will be: Beijing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Suzhou, Wuxi, Yangzhou, Zhenjiang, Wenzhou, Fuzhou, Xiamen, Zibo, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Kunming.

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: China, Wenzhou, cities, cloud, internet of things, sensory cities, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

In April, Radar reported that Energy.gov was moving to Drupal. This morning, the Energy Department launched a redesigned Energy.gov as an interactive open platform that enables information exchange, open data and localized information for citizens. The new Energy.gov uses a combination of open source technology and cloud computing will save an estimated $10 million dollars annually, according to Energy Department officials.

“Our goal is to make Energy.gov easier to use, more transparent and more participatory,” said Secretary of Energy Steven Chu in a prepared statement. “This next phase is part of our ongoing commitment to empower consumers and businesses with the information, tools and services they need to save money, create jobs and find opportunities in the new energy economy.”

The new Energy.gov is built using Drupal 7, the same open source content management system used at WhiteHouse.gov, Commerce.gov, House.gov, and it’s the system that supported the reboot of FCC.gov as an open government platform. Drupal distributions are now supporting a growing number of open government platforms in local, state and federal government.

Posted at 12:00pm and tagged with: cloud, energy, government, tech, technology, open source,.

THE federal government has finally unveiled its highly anticipated cloud computing strategy, which encourages rather than mandates the use of such technologies in public sector.

The government believes it will take a few years before public clouds will have the privacy and security arrangements required to host government data.

A government “storefront” or apps store could be established in 20 months, pending an investigation.

By the end of the year, the government will decide whether a whole-of-government panel for public cloud service providers should be set up.

The 45-page document was largely welcomed by research firm Ovum Australia, whose analysts have in the past been vocal critics of Canberra’s draft cloud strategy.

Full Story: The Australian

Posted at 12:47pm and tagged with: Transparency, government, tech, technology, cloud, cloud computing,.

mediafuturist:

(via Instapaper)

Posted at 7:19am and tagged with: tech, technology, cloud, computing,.

Dropbox: The hottest startup you’ve never heard of - Fortune Tech (via mediafuturist)

Paul Higgins: We are avid users of Dropbox - a simple, clean service that delivers what it says it will. Because our operations are based in cyberspace we sue it to share image files for presentations, and accounts information.

Posted at 11:01am and tagged with: startups, cloud, technology, digital,.

Thanks to a lean operation with some 45 employees, Dropbox reportedly experiences well over 10 times year-over-year growth and positive cash flow. Sources say its revenue met internal 2011 sales projections in 2010, and Benioff predicts sales could hit $100 million this year. (The company declined to comment

However, are its expectations a bit too optimistic? According to a report published by market research firm In-Stat, by 2014, businesses in the United States will spend more than $13 billion on cloud computing and managed hosting services. Even if that spend is doubled considering the international market, the market will be around $30 billion by 2015,

Full Story: CIOZone

Posted at 4:43pm and tagged with: computing, cloud, economic,.