Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

MIT Scientist Captures 90,000 Hours of Video of His Son’s First Words, Graphs It

Cognitive scientist Deb Roy blew the curve for Flip cam-packing proud pops. Since he and his wife brought their son home from the hospital, Roy has captured his every movement and word with a series of fisheye-lens cameras installed in every room. The purpose was to understand how we learn language.


Full Story: FastCompany

Posted at 8:19am and tagged with: panopticon, cognitive, internet of things, tech, technology,.

MIT Scientist Captures 90,000 Hours of Video of His Son’s First Words, Graphs It


Cognitive scientist Deb Roy blew the curve for Flip cam-packing proud pops. Since he and his wife brought their son home from the hospital, Roy has captured his every movement and word with a series of fisheye-lens cameras installed in every room. The purpose was to understand how we learn language.

Full Story: FastCompany

Human Attention to a Particular Portion of an Image Alters the Way the Brain Processes Visual Cortex Responses to That Image

Our ability to ignore some, but not other stimuli, allows us to focus our attention and improve our performance on a specific task. The ability to respond to visual stimuli during a visual task hinges on altered brain processing of responses within the visual cortex at the back of the brain, where visual information is first received from the eyes. How this occurs was recently demonstrated by an international team of researchers led by Justin Gardner at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Wako.


Full Story: Science Daily

Posted at 8:19pm and tagged with: cognitive, focus, attention, brain,.

Human Attention to a Particular Portion of an Image Alters the Way the Brain Processes Visual Cortex Responses to That Image


Our ability to ignore some, but not other stimuli, allows us to focus our attention and improve our performance on a specific task. The ability to respond to visual stimuli during a visual task hinges on altered brain processing of responses within the visual cortex at the back of the brain, where visual information is first received from the eyes. How this occurs was recently demonstrated by an international team of researchers led by Justin Gardner at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Wako.

Full Story: Science Daily

Learning Best When You Rest: Sleeping After Processing New Info Most Effective


Nodding off in class may not be such a bad idea after all. New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that going to sleep shortly after learning new material is most beneficial for recall.


Full Story: Science Daily


Posted at 2:40pm and tagged with: cognitive, memory, education, learning,.

Learning Best When You Rest: Sleeping After Processing New Info Most Effective

Nodding off in class may not be such a bad idea after all. New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that going to sleep shortly after learning new material is most beneficial for recall.

Full Story: Science Daily

Study Shines Light On Brain Mechanism That Controls Reward Enjoyment

 What characterizes many people with depression, schizophrenia and some other mental illnesses is anhedonia: an inability to gain pleasure from normally pleasurable experiences……Exactly why this happens is unclear. But new research led by neuroscientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine may have literally shined a light on the answer, one that could lead to the discovery of new mental health therapies


Full Story: Science Daily

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: brain, cognitive,.

Study Shines Light On Brain Mechanism That Controls Reward Enjoyment


 What characterizes many people with depression, schizophrenia and some other mental illnesses is anhedonia: an inability to gain pleasure from normally pleasurable experiences……Exactly why this happens is unclear. But new research led by neuroscientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine may have literally shined a light on the answer, one that could lead to the discovery of new mental health therapies

Full Story: Science Daily

John K. Mullen, hbr.org

If you’re a digital native, you should be aware that the internet may have partially rewired your brain in such a way that when you meet people face to face, you’re less capable of figuring out what they’re thinking.

No, I’m not joking. There’s …

Posted at 10:47am and tagged with: tech, technology, cognitive,.

smarterplanet:

First step toward creating a 3D artificial brain | KurzweilAI

Nerve cells growing on a three-dimensional nanocellulose scaffold. Functioning synapses are yellow; the red spots show where synapses have been destroyed (credit: Philip Krantz, Chalmers)

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg have taken the first step in creating a three-dimensional model of the brain by attaching neurons to a positively charged nanocellulose scaffold.

The purpose is to understand Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease better, for example.

Nitrocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose) is obtained from plant materials, such as woodpulp.

‟Pores can be created in nanocellulose, which allows nerve cells to grow in a three-dimensional matrix. This makes it extra comfortable for the cells and creates a realistic cultivation environment that is more like a real brain compared with a three-dimensional cell cultivation well,” says Paul Gatenholm, Professor of Biopolymer Technology at Chalmers.

Posted at 10:47am and tagged with: tech, technology, artificial intelligence, brain, cognitive,.

smarterplanet:

First step toward creating a 3D artificial brain | KurzweilAI
Nerve cells growing on a three-dimensional nanocellulose scaffold. Functioning synapses are yellow; the red spots show where synapses have been destroyed (credit: Philip Krantz, Chalmers)
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg have taken the first step in creating a three-dimensional model of the brain by attaching neurons to a positively charged nanocellulose scaffold.
The purpose is to understand Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease better, for example.
Nitrocellulose (microfibrillated cellulose) is obtained from plant materials, such as woodpulp.
‟Pores can be created in nanocellulose, which allows nerve cells to grow in a three-dimensional matrix. This makes it extra comfortable for the cells and creates a realistic cultivation environment that is more like a real brain compared with a three-dimensional cell cultivation well,” says Paul Gatenholm, Professor of Biopolymer Technology at Chalmers.

stoweboyd:

In a study published last year, S. Adam Brasel and James Gips studied the behavior of TV use when a computer was also present:

Media Multitasking Behavior: Concurrent Television and Computer Usage - Brasel and Gips, published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

Changes in the…

Posted at 8:34pm and tagged with: attention, multitasking, cognitive,.

Shyness Study Examines How Human Brain Adapts to Stimuli

Shyness may be the result of deficits in two areas of the brain, new research from Vanderbilt University finds. Extremely shy or inhibited individuals are typically slow to acclimate to new people.

Paul Higgins: I think that we have to be really careful in these sorts of areas in confusing the ideas of a disease with a range of behaviours or states along a continuum of normal human behaviour. Having been a shy child myself, and still tending towards the shy and introverted side of the spectrum (although a lot of people would not pick that up) I think it is important that when seeking to understand how the brain works we do not categorise people as abnormal just because they are not average.

Full Story: Science Daily

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: cognitive, brain, science,.

Shyness Study Examines How Human Brain Adapts to Stimuli

Shyness may be the result of deficits in two areas of the brain, new research from Vanderbilt University finds. Extremely shy or inhibited individuals are typically slow to acclimate to new people.

Paul Higgins: I think that we have to be really careful in these sorts of areas in confusing the ideas of a disease with a range of behaviours or states along a continuum of normal human behaviour. Having been a shy child myself, and still tending towards the shy and introverted side of the spectrum (although a lot of people would not pick that up) I think it is important that when seeking to understand how the brain works we do not categorise people as abnormal just because they are not average.

Full Story: Science Daily

Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read?



Digital books are lighter and more convenient to tote around than paper books, but there may be advantages to old technology.
Paul Higgins: The evidence here seems a bit flimsy but it is a reasonable question to ask. The wider question must be in the context of how those e-books are used more generally. If I carry around a set of important e-books on my iPad and keep referring to them for information then that is likely to reinforce my knowledge more than the paper versions which I could never physically carry around in the same way. There are also social questions to ask with new sharing and annotating systems developing. The question of learning has to be in the context of how the e-books are used in total.



Full Story: Time

Posted at 8:34pm and tagged with: ebooks, cognitive, education,.

Do E-Books Make It Harder to Remember What You Just Read?


Digital books are lighter and more convenient to tote around than paper books, but there may be advantages to old technology.

Paul Higgins: The evidence here seems a bit flimsy but it is a reasonable question to ask. The wider question must be in the context of how those e-books are used more generally. If I carry around a set of important e-books on my iPad and keep referring to them for information then that is likely to reinforce my knowledge more than the paper versions which I could never physically carry around in the same way. There are also social questions to ask with new sharing and annotating systems developing. The question of learning has to be in the context of how the e-books are used in total.
Full Story: Time