Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

cnet:

Do non-iPad tablets stand a chance?

NEW ORLEANS—A year ago, tablets were on the rise, and the industry forecast looked promising for expanding a market that Apple essentially pioneered. So why aren’t non-iOS tablets doing better? That’s the question posed at CTIA 2012 by All Things D’s Walt Mossberg, who moderated a panel exploring the topic.

“Here we sit in May 2012, and it’s still heavily an iPad world in tablets,” Mossberg said, suggesting that Android tablets (and presumably Windows Phone and BlackBerry tablets, too) are hitting a dead end. 

Read more

Posted at 8:21am and tagged with: technology, tablets, competition, trends,.

cnet:

Do non-iPad tablets stand a chance?
NEW ORLEANS—A year ago, tablets were on the rise, and the industry forecast looked promising for expanding a market that Apple essentially pioneered. So why aren’t non-iOS tablets doing better? That’s the question posed at CTIA 2012 by All Things D’s Walt Mossberg, who moderated a panel exploring the topic.
“Here we sit in May 2012, and it’s still heavily an iPad world in tablets,” Mossberg said, suggesting that Android tablets (and presumably Windows Phone and BlackBerry tablets, too) are hitting a dead end. 
Read more

parislemon:

This post should have actually been titled “Why Facebook Needs To Build Their Own Phone”. 

Everything I hear indicates that Facebook’s once big HTML5 dreams keep getting pushed and pushed and pushed. It’s a noble cause, but it’s also one they have to take up, since they don’t control the key platforms: iOS and Android. 

All the finger-crossing hasn’t worked. And Facebook grows impatient. Building their own browser may be the first step. But eventually, the phone will have to come.

Posted at 4:42am and tagged with: competition, tech, technology, user interface, applications,.

thisistheverge:

Competition is king: why Nokia and Microsoft are the perfect match

Stop. Rewind 15 months. Play. Stephen Elop sits in a Nokia boardroom, surrounded by a multinational group of execs sweating beads of anxiety. It’s not exactly Downfall, but it’s close. 

Posted at 2:49am and tagged with: tech, technology, disruption, competition, smartphones,.

thisistheverge:

Competition is king: why Nokia and Microsoft are the perfect match
Stop. Rewind 15 months. Play. Stephen Elop sits in a Nokia boardroom, surrounded by a multinational group of execs sweating beads of anxiety. It’s not exactly Downfall, but it’s close. 

Why it’s China’s turn to worry about manufacturing

"America has been extremely worried about the loss of manufacturing to China. Seduced by subsidies, cheap labor, lax regulations, and a rigged currency, American industry has made a beeline to China.

But the tide may soon turn.

New technologies will likely cause the same hollowing out of China’s manufacturing industry over the next two decades that the U.S experienced over the past twenty years. That’s right. America is destined to once again gain its supremacy in manufacturing, and it will soon be China’s turn to worry.”

Full Story: Venture Beat

Posted at 8:34pm and tagged with: competition, innovation, China, USA,.

Why it’s China’s turn to worry about manufacturing

"America has been extremely worried about the loss of manufacturing to China. Seduced by subsidies, cheap labor, lax regulations, and a rigged currency, American industry has made a beeline to China.
But the tide may soon turn.
New technologies will likely cause the same hollowing out of China’s manufacturing industry over the next two decades that the U.S experienced over the past twenty years. That’s right. America is destined to once again gain its supremacy in manufacturing, and it will soon be China’s turn to worry.”
Full Story: Venture Beat

Android’s Share Collapses For The First Time Ever

Android’s share of the the U.S. smartphone market sales collapsed for the first time ever in November and October as consumers bought up the iPhone 4S. Now that Apple sells the iPhone on Verizon, Sprint and AT&T, it actually closed the gap on Android.

The big question for Apple: Is this is a short term jolt driven by the iPhone 4S which came out in October, or is it a long term trend?

Full Story: Business Insider



Posted at 6:06am and tagged with: competition, mobile, technology, tech,.

Android’s Share Collapses For The First Time Ever

Android’s share of the the U.S. smartphone market sales collapsed for the first time ever in November and October as consumers bought up the iPhone 4S. Now that Apple sells the iPhone on Verizon, Sprint and AT&T, it actually closed the gap on Android.
The big question for Apple: Is this is a short term jolt driven by the iPhone 4S which came out in October, or is it a long term trend?

Full Story: Business Insider

Libraries Make Room For High-Tech ‘Hackerspaces’ : NPR

  (via rachelfershleiser)

The problem by this view is that there are many others aiming for that business as well… And when it becomes a business, maybe libraries are not that competitive??

(via futuramb)

(Source: shrinkinglibrarian)

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: libraries, books, disruption, competition,.

We see the library as not being in the book business, but being in the learning business and the exploration business and the expand-your-mind business…

stoweboyd:

Adam Clark Estes

It took months of waiting, a couple of false starts and a whole lot of speculation, but Facebook has finally launched an iPad app. However, the upgrade is much more than a tablet-friendly version of the website. Facebook is also carrying over its developer platform to mobile. This means that all of the slick new class of Facebook apps that Mark Zuckerberg announced a couple of weeks ago at the f8 developers conference will be more integrated into the mobile experience. The specific details are a little bit confusing at first as Facebook is spoon-feeding the functionality to users, but we can already tell: Facebook is starting to function like an independent mobile operating system.

[…]

As [Facebook’s Luke] Shepard explains [here], Facebook apps will now be fully integrated into the mobile experience as their own apps within the Facebook app. If you receive a notification or request from a friend in a compatible app, tapping the update will switch to the mobile app if you have it on your phone or take you to Apple’s app store to download it. Shepard uses Words with Friends as an example. Let’s say your pal plays the word “quixotic”—a high scorer, by the way—you’ll receive a notification and tapping it will take your straight to the app to make your move. Facebook is also extending Credits to the mobile apps so you can also buy things within their framework. Again, it’s like its own little operating system within Apple’s iOS.

Facebook is headed toward a direct confrontation with Apple and Google (and Amazon and Microsoft) for the future of computing: the social operating system.

Apple certainly shouldn’t let Facebook create an independent app store.

When is Facebook going to develop its own tablet?

Posted at 7:52pm and tagged with: tech, technology, competition, tablets, operating system, social media,.

$1,000 house a step closer for world’s poor


MIT architects have produced the first prototype “Pinwheel House” in an effort to see if low-cost homes can be constructed for $1,000, total.

Full Story: ZDNET

Posted at 7:31am and tagged with: innovation, design, competition, housing,.

$1,000 house a step closer for world’s poor

MIT architects have produced the first prototype “Pinwheel House” in an effort to see if low-cost homes can be constructed for $1,000, total.
Full Story: ZDNET

CHART OF THE DAY: The Two Cellphone Makers That Might Be Shopping For An OS Next

Looking at a chart of mobile vendors’ operating margins from Asymco, there are two other mobile phone companies who are suffering under the onslaught of the iPhone: LG and Sony-Ericsson.

The options for these companies include diversification to more platforms, trying to strike a deeper relationship with either Microsoft or Google, or getting out of the phone business entirely.

Full Story: Business Insider


 

Posted at 6:36pm and tagged with: mobile, operating systems, competition, business models, tech, technology,.

CHART OF THE DAY: The Two Cellphone Makers That Might Be Shopping For An OS Next


Looking at a chart of mobile vendors’ operating margins from Asymco, there are two other mobile phone companies who are suffering under the onslaught of the iPhone: LG and Sony-Ericsson.
The options for these companies include diversification to more platforms, trying to strike a deeper relationship with either Microsoft or Google, or getting out of the phone business entirely.

Full Story: Business Insider
 

smarterplanet:

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb

Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.

The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: Amazon, HTML5, Kindle, apps, commerce, products, competition, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb
Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS  apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the  margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.
The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s  accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around  Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of  an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality  of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for  Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.