Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.
What we learned is that when it comes to the brain and cooperation, the whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts,” said Fortune, of the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. “We found that the brain of each individual participant prefers the combined activity over his or her own part.

stoweboyd:

Nicholas Kulish digs into the rise of civil unrest in recent months, and finds decentralized, bottom-up, and spontaneous resistance to established order, even those parts of the establishment that theoretically represent the interests of ‘the people’, like political parties and unions:

Nicholas…

Posted at 6:11pm and tagged with: civil unrest, rōnin economy, cooperation, collaboration, collectives, connectives, liquid media, liquid world, liquid unrest, xl,.

THE extraordinary success of Homo sapiens is a result of four things: intelligence, language, an ability to manipulate objects dexterously in order to make tools, and co-operation. Over the decades the anthropological spotlight has shifted from one to another of these as the prime mover of the package, and thus the fundament of the human condition. At the moment co-operation is the most fashionable subject of investigation. In particular, why are humans so willing to collaborate with unrelated strangers, even to the point of risking being cheated by people whose characters they cannot possibly know? Evidence from economic games played in the laboratory for real money suggests humans are both trusting of those they have no reason to expect they will ever see again, and surprisingly unwilling to cheat them—and that these phenomena are deeply ingrained in the species’s psychology. Existing theories of the evolution of trust depend either on the participants being relatives (and thus sharing genes) or on their relationship being long-term, with each keeping count to make sure the overall benefits of collaboration exceed the costs. Neither applies in the case of passing strangers, and that has led to speculation that something extraordinary, such as a need for extreme collaboration prompted by the emergence of warfare that uses weapons, has happened in recent human evolution to promote the emergence of an instinct for unconditional generosity.

Paul Higgins: I particularly liked:

, “Ten years ago, 80 to 90 percent of an organization’s budget would be spent on individual workspaces. Now, it’s 65 to 70 percent and is scaling down to 50 percent real fast.”

When the money expenditure is already happening at this level you have missed the early trend

stoweboyd:

The world of business is being re-contoured by the new realities, like ubiquitous connectivity, genius phones, Air/iPad, and the rethinking of ‘offices’.

Alison Arieff, Rethinking the Office Workspace, Part Two

Herman Miller is still selling cubicles, to be sure, but can also read the…

Posted at 6:44am and tagged with: campbell mckellar, collaborative, cooperation, libraries, loosecubes, social architecture, work, design, tech, technology,.

E-Commerce Spawns Networks of Frenemies


Why more Web merchants now work cautiously with their competitors.

Posted at 6:25pm and tagged with: internet, cooperation,.

E-Commerce Spawns Networks of Frenemies

Why more Web merchants now work cautiously with their competitors.

Gut bacteria in Japanese people borrowed sushi-digesting genes from ocean bacteria

Japanese people have special tools that let them get more out of eating sushi

Posted at 9:42pm and tagged with: evolution, cooperation, DNA,.

Gut bacteria in Japanese people borrowed sushi-digesting genes from ocean bacteria

Japanese people have special tools that let them get more out of eating sushi