Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

futuramb:

3-D printing, copyright, and intellectual property. - Slate Magazine

Fortunately, a technology on the verge of going mainstream will soon give us a chance to re-examine the role that copyright plays in our lives. By connecting the physical and the digital, 3-D printers remind us that copyright is not a general-purpose legal right that allows people to demand control over whatever they want. Instead, copyright has a narrow scope. And most of the things that make up our world simply do not fall into it.

This article is important in two respects. It puts the finger on the really strange development that copyright and other IPR regulations have become to be seen as a general principle covering everything around us - a completely new and unintended way of organizing the world which moves a huge amount of power from the individuals to organizations with the deepest pockets and/or the best layers. But it also points out that this positions is going to be dramatically challenged when 3D-printing enters the arena as a generally available technology.

Posted at 1:14pm and tagged with: copyright, tech, technology, disruption, 3D Printing,.

futuramb:

3-D printing, copyright, and intellectual property. - Slate Magazine

Fortunately, a technology on the verge of going mainstream will soon give us a chance to re-examine the role that copyright plays in our lives. By connecting the physical and the digital, 3-D printers remind us that copyright is not a general-purpose legal right that allows people to demand control over whatever they want. Instead, copyright has a narrow scope. And most of the things that make up our world simply do not fall into it.

This article is important in two respects. It puts the finger on the really strange development that copyright and other IPR regulations have become to be seen as a general principle covering everything around us - a completely new and unintended way of organizing the world which moves a huge amount of power from the individuals to organizations with the deepest pockets and/or the best layers. But it also points out that this positions is going to be dramatically challenged when 3D-printing enters the arena as a generally available technology.
Some game developers — the digital-era equivalent of songwriters and authors, in many ways — have also come to see piracy as being a necessary evil, and in many cases a positive force. Markus Persson, the Swedish developer of the massively popular game Minecraft, has said that he came to see piracy of his game as a form of marketing. And at a recent music-industry conference in Europe, the CEO of superstar game company Rovio (creator of Angry Birds) said that piracy “may not be a bad thing” because it increases demand for the official version of the company’s products.

Piracy is part of the digital ecosystem


Paul Higgins: Really interesting article on the whole area. I really liked Clay Shirky’s story in Here Comes Everybody about the Abbot of Sponheim. The good Abbott wrote an impassioned piece defending the “scribal tradition” against the printing press. Then because he wanted it distributed as widely as possible he had it printed. There is a similar level of hypocrisy in some of the descriptions of behaviour in this article. A very good read.

Full Story: The Guardian

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: pircay, copyright, technology, tech,.

Piracy is part of the digital ecosystem


Paul Higgins: Really interesting article on the whole area. I really liked Clay Shirky’s story in Here Comes Everybody about the Abbot of Sponheim. The good Abbott wrote an impassioned piece defending the “scribal tradition” against the printing press. Then because he wanted it distributed as widely as possible he had it printed. There is a similar level of hypocrisy in some of the descriptions of behaviour in this article. A very good read.
Full Story: The Guardian

parislemon:

Kal Raustiala and Chris Sprigman of Freakonomics discuss the claims that piracy leads to $250 billion a year in loses and 750,000 American jobs lost:

The good news is that the numbers are wrong — as this post by the Cato Institute’s Julian Sanchez explains. In 2010, the Government Accountability Office released a report noting that these figures “cannot be substantiated or traced back to an underlying data source or methodology,” which is polite government-speak for “these figures were made up out of thin air.” 

And:

So what’s the real number? At this point, we simply don’t know. And this leads us to a second problem: one which is not so much about data, as about actual economic effects.  There are certainly a lot of people who download music and movies without paying. It’s clear that, at least in some cases, piracy substitutes for a legitimate transaction — for example, a person who would have bought the DVD of the new Kate Beckinsale vampire film (who is that, actually?) but instead downloads it for free on Bit Torrent. In other cases, the person pirating the movie or song would never have bought it. This is especially true if the consumer lives in a relatively poor country, like China, and is simply unable to afford to pay for the films and music he downloads.  

Do we count this latter category of downloads as “lost sales”?  Not if we’re honest. 

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: Piracy, Copyright, Economic,.

A Thoughtful post by Fred Wilson on PIPA/SOPA and online piracy including:

" I told him that we need to find a different way to address the online piracy problem because otherwise the technology community was in for a game of whack a mole with the content industry every year or two with our elected officials getting caught in the middle"

Well worth the read

Full Story: AVC

Posted at 3:41pm and tagged with: internet, copyright, politics,.

nevver:

Go Directly to Jail, Do not Collect $200, Sopapoly

Posted at 10:50am and tagged with: just because, copyright, politics, internet,.

nevver:

Go Directly to Jail, Do not Collect $200, Sopapoly

reuters:

Putting it into perspective: Megaupload had 25 petabytes of data residing on more than 1,000 servers. One petabyte of data, according to Gizmodo, equals 13.3 years of high definition television content. If our math is correct, that’s 332.5 years worth of HDTV content stored on Megaupload’s servers.

Analysis: Megaupload shutdown unlikely to deter piracy

Posted at 10:15am and tagged with: copyright, internet, technology, tech, disruption,.

reuters:

Putting it into perspective: Megaupload had 25 petabytes of data residing on more than 1,000 servers. One petabyte of data, according to Gizmodo, equals 13.3 years of high definition television content. If our math is correct, that’s 332.5 years worth of HDTV content stored on Megaupload’s servers.
Analysis: Megaupload shutdown unlikely to deter piracy

A TED Talk: Clay Shirky: Why SOPA is a bad idea

Posted at 3:55pm and tagged with: internet, technology, copyright,.

The way I see it, there’s a lack of need for any legislation at all. As a publisher, I have a very deep experience here, and the fact is that piracy is not a significant problem. Yes, there are people who are pirating my books, there are people who are sharing links to places where they can be downloaded. But the vast majority of customers are willing to pay if the product is widely available and the price is fair.

threatpost:

A Graphical Look at Digital Piracy:

Read the companion piece at Threatpost.

Images from the American Assembly’s Copy Culture Survey

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: tech, technology, copyright,.