Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

climateadaptation:

Urban Renewal

These 10 global infrastructure and tech companies are among the early leaders in smart-city programs.

“Like Siemens and ABB, most of the beneficiaries of urbanization will be infrastructure and technology outfits that provide or utilize smartphones, sensors and software and services to track the use of a city’s assets and commit resources when and where they’re needed. Cloud technology, which can cut costs while boosting computing capacity, will play a big role. Even social media will participate, as cities multiply the ways a citizen can spot a problem–anything from a water-main break to a traffic snarl–and then alert others to avoid it or do something about it.

Technology researchers at IDC estimate the size of the smart-city information-technology market is now $34 billion annually and will gain 18%-plus a year to $57 billion by 2014. That’s not a huge amount to global giants, but certainly enough to help drive growth. (The companies don’t break out earnings related to these projects.) The market has broadened to include items like broadband connectivity, green belts, renewable energy, green buildings and other intelligent-city systems. “You are talking about smart water, smart transportation, better public safety,” says Jennifer Bélissent, a consultant at Forrester.”

Source: Barron’s “Dawn of the Smart City”

Posted at 7:55pm and tagged with: siemens, ibm, abb, cisco, smart growth, smart grid, energy, economy, economic development, cities, urban planning, planning, barrons, infrastructure, leaders,.

climateadaptation:

Urban Renewal
These 10 global infrastructure and tech companies are among the early leaders in smart-city programs.
“Like Siemens and ABB, most of the beneficiaries of urbanization will  be infrastructure and technology outfits that provide or utilize  smartphones, sensors and software and services to track the use of a  city’s assets and commit resources when and where they’re needed. Cloud  technology, which can cut costs while boosting computing capacity, will  play a big role. Even social media will participate, as cities multiply  the ways a citizen can spot a problem–anything from a water-main break  to a traffic snarl–and then alert others to avoid it or do something  about it.
Technology researchers at IDC estimate  the size of the smart-city information-technology market is now $34  billion annually and will gain 18%-plus a year to $57 billion by 2014.  That’s not a huge amount to global giants, but certainly enough to help  drive growth. (The companies don’t break out earnings related to these  projects.) The market has broadened to include items like broadband  connectivity, green belts, renewable energy, green buildings and other  intelligent-city systems. “You are talking about smart water, smart  transportation, better public safety,” says Jennifer Bélissent, a  consultant at Forrester.”
Source: Barron’s “Dawn of the Smart City”

climateadaptation:

Looks like we’ll reclaim our Number 1 spot for the first time in 40 years. Story is paywalled at The Sunday Time, but a blogger copied the nut, HERE. And here’s Dow Jones’s clip:

LONDON -The U.S. will soon become the world’s top oil producer, The Sunday Times reported Goldman Sachs as…

Posted at 4:18am and tagged with: opec, oil and gass, oil, drilling, goldman sachs, london, USA, climate change, commodities, economics, economy, economic development,.

Every single study that’s ever been done suggests that pollution control actually, invariably is an economic stimulus in that it creates jobs in the construction industry, engineering, in technology and in the past, historically, the United States has been able to export some of that technology to the rest of the world.
Paul Higgins: I am travelling in Cambodia and Vietnam at the moment and will not eat the prawns or shrimp for two reasons - the farming methods and the fact that they are filter feeders and therefore collect al sorts of stuff in their system

climateadaptation:

I don’t eat shrimp. Ever. Here’s why:

2 student teams, 2 innovative video reports on shrimp farming — Pace U. on best practices and a prospect for shrimp farmed with the planet in mind and Univ. of British Columbia on pollution, land and water problems in Thai shrimp industry.

(Source: revkin)

Posted at 8:42am and tagged with: revkin, farming, agriculture, aquaculture, environment, thailand, shrimp, food, pollution, crops, antibiotics, land use, economic development, EU, GMO, asia,.