Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

Human Attention to a Particular Portion of an Image Alters the Way the Brain Processes Visual Cortex Responses to That Image

Our ability to ignore some, but not other stimuli, allows us to focus our attention and improve our performance on a specific task. The ability to respond to visual stimuli during a visual task hinges on altered brain processing of responses within the visual cortex at the back of the brain, where visual information is first received from the eyes. How this occurs was recently demonstrated by an international team of researchers led by Justin Gardner at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Wako.


Full Story: Science Daily

Posted at 8:19pm and tagged with: cognitive, focus, attention, brain,.

Human Attention to a Particular Portion of an Image Alters the Way the Brain Processes Visual Cortex Responses to That Image


Our ability to ignore some, but not other stimuli, allows us to focus our attention and improve our performance on a specific task. The ability to respond to visual stimuli during a visual task hinges on altered brain processing of responses within the visual cortex at the back of the brain, where visual information is first received from the eyes. How this occurs was recently demonstrated by an international team of researchers led by Justin Gardner at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Wako.

Full Story: Science Daily

Steve Jobs, WWDC 1997

Saying no is actually saying yes to other things…

(h/t Aaron Zuchhold)

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: strategy, leadership, focus,.

People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying ‘no’ to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the things we haven’t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying ‘no’ to 1000 things.

Paul Higgins: Sometimes need one of these

nevver:

I’m busy, 50watts

Posted at 7:56pm and tagged with: The Isolator, focus, just because,.

Paul Higgins: Sometimes need one of these
nevver:

I’m busy, 50watts

Paul Higgins: I like the line that “I am increasingly in a distracted present”. My work demands undisturbed time to think write. I am luckier than most in my opportunity to have that time. However the ability to create that time is in part down to my self discipline. It is amazing how many people give me a hard time about being tough and disciplined around that precious time. It is as if they are either addicted to the noise themselves or subconsciously jealous because they are always being interrupted.

roelofbotha:

http://www.edge.org/q2010/q10_6.html

Reading this made me think about the wisdom of an increasing number of people who are declaring email bankruptcy. They no longer attempt to stay up to date with every email that wedges its way into their inbox. They are selective in how they choose to spend the time. The greatest virtue of this, in my view, is the space this creates for them to think, to contemplate, and to innovate.

Some of the choice quotes from Douglas’ article include:

  • The Internet pushes us all toward the immediate
  • … immediacy masquerading as relevancy
  • … denies me access to the moment in which I am really living
  • The now-ness of the Internet engenders impulsive, unthinking responses over considered ones, and a tendency to think of communications as a way to bark orders or fend off those of others
  •  I feel as though I speeding up, when I am actually just becoming less productive, less thoughtful, and less capable of asserting any agency over the world in which I live
  • I am increasingly in a distracted present

Posted at 7:34am and tagged with: cognitive, focus, productivity,.

Tony Schwartz, MIX Maverick and author of The Way We’re Working isn’t Working, shares four simple but powerful changes you can make today to ramp up your productivity, creativity, and well-being.

Paul Higgins: I have been involved in the MIX on a management hackathon project and have both enjoyed the experience and been given lots of ideas and different perspectives. On top of that there is lots of great material available. This one is just under 9 minutes long but well worth the trouble. You will make up the 9 minutes the day you watch it.
 

Posted at 3:39pm and tagged with: business tips, productivity, focus,.

Paul Higgins: Everyone should read this. I was particularly taken by:

There’s the senior executive at a big consumer products company who told me she can’t remember the last time she was able to focus on one thing, uninterrupted, for more than 30 minutes.

From a way of working and thinking point of view that is ridiculous. I get to work a lot more flexibly than the senior executive named and often turn off the phone and other distractions to write or to work on some major client project. I feel guilty about doing it and get a hard time from people who cannot reach me. I also take the occasional day time nap and get ribbed by partner about it. We have to find a different way

mediafuturist:

(via Instapaper)

Posted at 11:34am and tagged with: work, focus, reflections,.

Growing Up Digital, Wired for Distraction

As others have stated this New York Times piece is actually a well balanced view on this issue rather than just a scaremongering article.

As Fred Wilson has said:

The technology amplifies whoever you are

Posted at 4:09am and tagged with: technology, distraction, focus,.

Growing Up Digital, Wired for Distraction
As others have stated this New York Times piece is actually a well balanced view on this issue rather than just a scaremongering article.
As Fred Wilson has said:
“The technology amplifies whoever you are”

Focus

The free version is simple: it’s 27 chapters that you can download for free, without having to give an email address or do anything else. It’s uncopyrighted, and you can share it with as many people as you like.If you go to

http://zenhabits.net/focus-book/  you can get a free pdf version of the book

Posted at 5:30am and tagged with: focus, work,.

Focus
The free version is simple: it’s 27 chapters that you can download for  free, without having to give an email address or do anything else. It’s  uncopyrighted, and you can share it with as many people as you like.If you go to
http://zenhabits.net/focus-book/  you can get a free pdf version of the book

smarterplanet:

Meditation Proven to Boost Brain Efficiency - Smarter Strategies

Chinese and U.S. researchers claim to have scientific evidence that guided meditation introduces positive structural changes in the brain, which help people regulate goal-oriented behaviors without all the stress. The research team led by professor Yi-Yuan Tang of Dalian University of Technology, working in collaboration with University of Oregon psychologist Michael I. Posner, found that just 11 hours of guided meditation is all you need to make positive structural changes in your brain. Their technique, called integrative body-mind training (IBMT), has been developed in China over the last two decades, but finally its positive benefits have been measured with the help of brain-imaging technology at the University of Oregon.

Posted at 7:29am and tagged with: cognitive, focus,.

smarterplanet:

Meditation Proven to Boost Brain Efficiency - Smarter Strategies
Chinese and U.S. researchers claim to have scientific evidence that guided meditation introduces positive structural changes in the brain, which help people regulate goal-oriented behaviors without all the stress. The research team led by professor Yi-Yuan Tang of Dalian University of Technology, working in collaboration with University of Oregon psychologist Michael I. Posner, found that just 11 hours of guided meditation is all you need to make positive structural changes in your brain. Their technique, called integrative body-mind training (IBMT), has been developed in China over the last two decades, but finally its positive benefits have been measured with the help of brain-imaging technology at the University of Oregon.