Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

futuramb:

The Myriad Uses Of The iPad In The Operating Room - Better Health

An exploratory article which mentions a number of areas where the multi talented iPad could be used in surgery is discussed and exemplified with a number of existing apps:

  • Communication - communicating and sharing images, data and knowledge between patients and specialists
  • Intraoperative visualization - visual presentation of vital signs and images that can increase the overview of the situation or add specific crucial details
  • Intraoperative measurement - supporting measurements and navigation during the operation
  • Augmented Reality in the Operating Room - supporting situation by adding complementary views (3D X-ray et al), information and specialist knowledge and advice as well as providing visual tools directly in the visual field of the surgeon in action

The article concludes by saying:

The iPad has the potential be a game changer in surgery because of its small size, built in sensors and wireless networking capabilities. The only restriction is the imagination of future surgical innovators. Even if the above predictions fail to materialize, it is safe to say what the future holds is only barely imagined today.

Posted at 7:55pm and tagged with: future, health care, ipad, tech, tablets,.

futuramb:

The Myriad Uses Of The iPad In The Operating Room - Better Health
An exploratory article which mentions a number of areas where the multi talented iPad could be used in surgery is discussed and exemplified with a number of existing apps:
Communication - communicating and sharing images, data and knowledge between patients and specialists
Intraoperative visualization - visual presentation of vital signs and images that can increase the overview of the situation or add specific crucial details
Intraoperative measurement - supporting measurements and navigation during the operation
Augmented Reality in the Operating Room - supporting situation by adding complementary views (3D X-ray et al), information and specialist knowledge and advice as well as providing visual tools directly in the visual field of the surgeon in action
The article concludes by saying:
The iPad has the potential be a game changer in surgery because of its small size, built in sensors and wireless networking capabilities. The only restriction is the imagination of future surgical innovators. Even if the above predictions fail to materialize, it is safe to say what the future holds is only barely imagined today.

futuramb:

Turning The iPhone Into A 350x Medical Microscope For Under $50 | TechCrunch

Using the iPhone (or any mobile smartphone or tablet device, really) for medical purposes isn’t a new thing, but it’s nice to see the applications people cook up. Just recently at Disrupt we saw Smartheart, and apps like Skin Scan are decentralizing some simple self-monitoring tasks like melanoma detection.

We’ve also seen lots of physical additions to the iPhone camera. You can get wide-angle lenses, telephotos, and even a 12x microscope lens. But a team of researchers at UC Davis has one-upped the competition by making the iPhone into a 350x microscope for very little money. Now you’ll be able to send people Instagrams of your blood cells.

Posted at 4:44pm and tagged with: iphone, health care, tech,.

futuramb:

Turning The iPhone Into A 350x Medical Microscope For Under $50 | TechCrunch

Using the iPhone (or any mobile smartphone or tablet device, really) for medical purposes isn’t a new thing, but it’s nice to see the applications people cook up. Just recently at Disrupt we saw Smartheart, and apps like Skin Scan are decentralizing some simple self-monitoring tasks like melanoma detection.
We’ve also seen lots of physical additions to the iPhone camera. You can get wide-angle lenses, telephotos, and even a 12x microscope lens. But a team of researchers at UC Davis has one-upped the competition by making the iPhone into a 350x microscope for very little money. Now you’ll be able to send people Instagrams of your blood cells.

futuramb:

This is yet another project based on mobile phones that is focusing on health care in Africa.

Since 2009, a mobile health program called ChildCount+  has coordinated a network of community-based health workers who examine local children, treat them, and then a send a text message about their health status back to a central web dashboard.

Posted at 7:56pm and tagged with: africa, health care, tech, technology, mobile,.

futuramb:

Industry experts predict medical tourism in Asia will grow at a rate of 15 to 20 percent a year, mainly due to the emergence of nouveaux riches in the region.

[…]

“Consumer choice is a powerful force now in healthcare and is impacted by aging and increasingly heavier, sicker, and more needy populations in Asia.”

Medscape News web site has forecast medical tourism in Asia could generate $4.4 billion by 2012.

The United States provides the most patients, as Americans travel abroad to avert the astronomical costs of having private treatment at home. Typically, Americans can save 40-50 percent.

This development is changing the view of that part of health care that can be defined and packaged as a specific treatment or surgery procedure. What will happen here is that these well defined treatment methods will be even more compared and market driven than ever - leading to a rapid global IKEA-ization of health care. The remaining challenges in most developed countries will be to meet the rest of the health care challenges which consequently are much more difficult to define and organize…

Posted at 4:45pm and tagged with: Health care, economic, health,.

futuramb:

The advent of cheaper sensors and wireless transmitters, along with ubiquitous computing power in the form of smart phones, is making it easier and easier for patients with chronic diseases to track their conditions at home. But many health-care providers seem reluctant to adopt these technologies.

Experts say this is, in large part, because of the reimbursement system in U.S. health care, where physicians are paid for each test or office visit they provide. Outside a few specialties, doctors won’t get paid for monitoring data that’s been gathered remotely.

Even if the statements is not exactly true for European health care the problems are similar: A too detailed specification and regulation of health care practices paired with the culture of charging for specific treatments rather than charging for keeping people healthy is destroying the possibilities for innovation and change.

It is becoming increasingly more evident than health care innovation will not come from inside traditional health care institutions or organisations. It will come from small unorthodox companies who are using modern technology to organize and perform health care in a different and really customer oriented way. I use to call it the IKEA-ization of health care…

Posted at 2:10pm and tagged with: Health care, tech, technology, mobile,.

futuramb:

Today chip manufacturing can no longer be performed by human beings, soon surgery might be there as well. We simply wouldn’t trust a human surgeon to carve inside us anymore since the machines can do things individuals cannot and with much less errors.

Posted at 4:44pm and tagged with: Future, health care, robotics, tech, technology,.

futuramb:

Read about four projects/initiatives that use mobile phones to support health care in Africa:

Posted at 9:16pm and tagged with: health care, mobile phones, africa,.

futuramb:

This is a wonderful example of a doctor whose business is reversing the increasing complexity in society, and in this case health care, by using available cheap technology to open a single doctor practice. Just like the old times, but using new tools. 

With $1,500, he set up a house-call-only practice in his Brooklyn, New York, neighborhood, serving only two zip codes. He created a website through Apple’s iWeb that featured his resume, and posted his schedule on a Google Calendar so patient’s could enter in an appointment time online.

He also opened a PayPal account for payments, and used Formstack to create forms for gathering patient medical histories and to create specific questionnaires for particular ailments. (Get tips on super-charging your documents suite.)

Whereas most practices deal with significant costs in office management, Parkinson’s start-up costs went to getting his license and buying tools, such as an otoscope and doctor’s bag.

The community’s response was immediate. Within six months, Parkinson had 400 patients, paying him from $100 to $200 per visit. (Read more on mobile payment tools for business.) In addition to old-fashioned face-to-face visits, Parkinson used whatever technology was convenient to keep in touch with his patients: e-mail, video chatting via Skype, or phone.

For young people starting business in different other areas this is nothing new. They are gathering at the coffices in groups formulating business plans, applying for funding or just start with their business immediately using the tools that are available.

What is working against this is just our mental models of “how things should be run properly” - a way of thinking which only seems to lead to increasing sophistication, i e increasing complexity, and further up to a point where everything collapses. Here I usually refer to Joseph Tainter’s theory in The Collapse of Complex Societies (New Studies in Archaeology)

Posted at 4:10am and tagged with: health care, complexity, organization,.

futuramb:

A UK pilot project for mass genetic screening of cancers will begin next month. The project will combine personalized medicine and centralized research, with the aim of benefiting patients and scientists.

[…]

Surplus material from biopsies on the tumours will be sent to three centralized laboratories and tested for specific genes and mutations. Eventually it is hoped that this information can be used to tailor treatments to a patient’s cancer. At the same time, the data will be held centrally and offer researchers a resource for improving medicine from the top down.

This could be an interesting way forward to increase the knowledge processes beyond what is possible with isolated information gathering and judgment in different regions or hospitals.

But… there is still this problem that public medical organizations must act as a top-down organization and ratify different treatment methods accordingly. That is why it will take some time and why they are careful and add:

The new pilot programme will not actually influence treatment decisions, because it is a proof of concept. But if successful, it could provide a model for bringing personalized medicine to the United Kingdom. This is likely to be increasingly important as, for example, drug companies look to identify which patients will benefit from expensive targeted therapies before they are administered.

Posted at 2:12pm and tagged with: Health Care, genetic, medicine,.

futuramb:

The UK’s Health Secretary Andrew Lansley has launched a competition inviting developers, doctors and patients to submit ideas for health apps that could help patients make informed decisions about their care.

This seems to be a good initiative. I wonder if anyone have thought about how to deal with the responsibility issues… 

Posted at 2:12pm and tagged with: apps, crowdsourcing, health care, tech, comeptition, innovation,.