Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

8bitfuture:

IKEA to sell entire houses.

The IKEA ‘aktiv’ prefabricated one bedroom homes will be entirely furnished with IKEA products, and are expected to sell for $86,500.

The aktiv line is reminiscent of trailers or motor homes — neat little 53 ft. x 14 ft. rectangles packed with funky, oddly named furniture. Ideabox says there’s no wasted space, which makes sense, since there’s not much space to be wasted. A combination of corrugated metal, fiber-cement siding and a metal roof house the mini Ikea wonderland, which comes equipped with a dual-flush toilet and energy-efficient electronics

Posted at 6:30am and tagged with: design, housing, Environment,.

8bitfuture:

IKEA to sell entire houses.
The IKEA ‘aktiv’ prefabricated one bedroom homes will be entirely furnished with IKEA products, and are expected to sell for $86,500.

The aktiv line is reminiscent of trailers or motor homes — neat little 53 ft. x 14 ft. rectangles packed with funky, oddly named furniture. Ideabox says there’s no wasted space, which makes sense, since there’s not much space to be wasted. A combination of corrugated metal, fiber-cement siding and a metal roof house the mini Ikea wonderland, which comes equipped with a dual-flush toilet and energy-efficient electronics

$1,000 house a step closer for world’s poor


MIT architects have produced the first prototype “Pinwheel House” in an effort to see if low-cost homes can be constructed for $1,000, total.

Full Story: ZDNET

Posted at 7:31am and tagged with: innovation, design, competition, housing,.

$1,000 house a step closer for world’s poor

MIT architects have produced the first prototype “Pinwheel House” in an effort to see if low-cost homes can be constructed for $1,000, total.
Full Story: ZDNET

Flexible condos can be reconfigured and resized

It’s a fact of life that people’s needs change over time, and that’s as true in housing as any other industry. Aiming to create condominiums that are flexible enough to accommodate some of that change, Canadian architectural firm Sweeny Sterling Finlayson & Co. has created a new, modular design for living spaces that allows them to adapt when needed.

Full Story: Springwise

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: design, innovation, housing,.

Flexible condos can be reconfigured and resized

It’s a fact of life that people’s needs change over time, and that’s as true in housing as any other industry. Aiming to create condominiums that are flexible enough to accommodate some of that change, Canadian architectural firm Sweeny Sterling Finlayson & Co. has created a new, modular design for living spaces that allows them to adapt when needed.
Full Story: Springwise

Building a $300 House for the Poor

Watch Vijay Govindarajan, the Earl C. Daum 1924 Professor of International Business at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, explain why he, along with co-author Christian Sarkar, wants to create scalable, affordable housing to replace slums. Govindarajan talks about what inspired him to propose a $300 House, why the time is right, and why businesses should want to be part of the solution.

Full Story: HBR

Posted at 4:10am and tagged with: innovation, housing, economic,.

Building a $300 House for the Poor

Watch Vijay Govindarajan, the Earl C. Daum 1924  Professor of International Business at the Tuck School of Business at  Dartmouth, explain why he, along with co-author Christian Sarkar, wants  to create scalable, affordable housing to replace slums. Govindarajan  talks about what inspired him to propose a $300 House, why the time is  right, and why businesses should want to be part of the solution.
Full Story: HBR

Aussie houses are world’s most overpriced

Australian homes remain the most overvalued in the world, giving fresh life to the debate over whether the nation’s housing market is a bubble.

The economic journal of the record, The Economist, says Australian housing is overpriced by 56 per cent.

Morgan Stanley global strategist Gerard Minack has been arguing the case for some time and thinks a bubble started to inflate in the late 1990s.

"We’ve had 20 years where the Australian consumers have been willing to borrow more to buy an asset that they believe always goes up in value - the classic sign of an asset bubble," he said.

Paul Higgins: I have thought this for  along time and the telling remark is that if people buy assets because they believe they will go up in price but the economic returns are not there then that is a bubble. I was concerned that when there was a bump in the road we would have real problems here in Australia with people reducing spending that had been premised on increasing housing loans and credit card debt. That would have been a triple whammy with people having reduced capacity to spend, interest taking more of a grab, and then people saving more to reduce their risk. That would have hit house prices hard. That did not happen through the global financial crisis. In the end people will pay for an asset like a house what they have to and in the final analysis that is determined by their financial capacity to pay - a function of income, interest rates, and availability of money. I don’t see that combination changing too much in the near future despite rising food and energy costs although a flattening out of the house market is highly likely in my view due to those factors.

Full Story: ABC News

Posted at 8:59am and tagged with: economic, housing, Australia,.

Aussie houses are world’s most overpriced

Australian homes remain the most overvalued in the  world, giving fresh life to the debate over whether the nation’s housing  market is a bubble.
The economic journal of the record, The Economist, says Australian housing is overpriced by 56 per cent.
Morgan Stanley global strategist Gerard Minack has been arguing the  case for some time and thinks a bubble started to inflate in the late  1990s.
"We’ve had 20 years where the Australian consumers have been willing  to borrow more to buy an asset that they believe always goes up in value  - the classic sign of an asset bubble," he said.

Paul Higgins: I have thought this for  along time and the telling remark is that if people buy assets because they believe they will go up in price but the economic returns are not there then that is a bubble. I was concerned that when there was a bump in the road we would have real problems here in Australia with people reducing spending that had been premised on increasing housing loans and credit card debt. That would have been a triple whammy with people having reduced capacity to spend, interest taking more of a grab, and then people saving more to reduce their risk. That would have hit house prices hard. That did not happen through the global financial crisis. In the end people will pay for an asset like a house what they have to and in the final analysis that is determined by their financial capacity to pay - a function of income, interest rates, and availability of money. I don’t see that combination changing too much in the near future despite rising food and energy costs although a flattening out of the house market is highly likely in my view due to those factors.
Full Story: ABC News

Housing Market Looks Sickest in Cities That Once Seemed Immune

The rolling real estate crash that ravaged Florida and the Southwest is delivering a new wave of distress to communities once thought to be immune — economically diversified cities where the boom was relatively restrained.

Full Story: New York Times

Posted at 2:12pm and tagged with: economic, gfc, housing, USA,.

Housing Market Looks Sickest in Cities That Once Seemed Immune

The rolling real estate crash that ravaged Florida and the Southwest is  delivering a new wave of distress to communities once thought to be  immune — economically diversified cities where the boom was relatively  restrained.
Full Story: New York Times

Here’s what Generation Y doesn’t want: formal living rooms, soaker bathtubs, dependence on a car. In other words, they don’t want their parents’ homes.

via @futuramb

Posted at 4:43pm and tagged with: housing,.

The New Pricey Prefabs

Prefabricated housing used to connote flimsy, cookie-cutter boxes, but not anymore.  factory-built homes don’t have to be tacky, and often aren’t cheap.

Posted at 9:15am and tagged with: housing, trends,.

The New Pricey Prefabs

Prefabricated housing used to connote flimsy, cookie-cutter boxes, but  not anymore.  factory-built homes don’t have to be tacky, and often  aren’t cheap.

Australians live in world’s biggest houses

New data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicates that new homes across Australia are bigger in square metre terms than anywhere else in the world.

Paul Higgins: Which is just crazy in terms of energy and resource use, and people complaining about the affordability of housing

Posted at 8:31am and tagged with: housing, climate change, energy,.

Australians live in world’s biggest houses

New data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicates that new homes across Australia are bigger in square metre terms than anywhere else in the world.

Paul Higgins: Which is just crazy in terms of energy and resource use, and people complaining about the affordability of housing