Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

smarterplanet:

World’s First City-Wide White Space Network Launched - Tech Europe - WSJ

The world’s first city-wide white-space network has been unveiled today in Cambridge, England.

Neul, which has been part of a trial of the technology in Cambridge, said the trial had been a success. According to Glenn Collinson, Neul’s co-founder, the company was moving to a pre-commercial phase this year with a view to a full commercial roll out in 2013. “The network is aimed squarely at ‘the Internet of things’ applications, machine to machine communication,” he said. “We see a whole host of things being enabled by this in smart cities.”

White space is the unused and underused parts of the wireless spectrum. For example, around the world many TV channels are left vacant in most locations. One of the issues had been whether there would be interference in the remaining TV frequencies. The trial established it was possible to keep them apart.

Other potential uses of the freed-up spectrum was as an alternative way of providing mobile broadband connectivity. Mr. Collinson said this was not on offer.

One of the first uses of the network will be smart electricity meters. This is the first step toward smart electricity grids that will allow electricity supply to be matched more efficiently to real-time demand.

“We see that as the first of many smart applications, starting in Cambridge, but spreading out to other cities.” Mr. Collinson would not say which cities were next, but did say there would be announcements about a city in North America and one in Asia.

Posted at 4:40am and tagged with: wireless, internet of things, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

World’s First City-Wide White Space Network Launched - Tech Europe - WSJ
The world’s first city-wide white-space network has been unveiled today in Cambridge, England.
Neul, which has been part of a trial of the technology in Cambridge, said the trial had been a success. According to Glenn Collinson, Neul’s co-founder, the company was moving to a pre-commercial phase this year with a view to a full commercial roll out in 2013. “The network is aimed squarely at ‘the Internet of things’ applications, machine to machine communication,” he said. “We see a whole host of things being enabled by this in smart cities.”
White space is the unused and underused parts of the wireless spectrum. For example, around the world many TV channels are left vacant in most locations. One of the issues had been whether there would be interference in the remaining TV frequencies. The trial established it was possible to keep them apart.
Other potential uses of the freed-up spectrum was as an alternative way of providing mobile broadband connectivity. Mr. Collinson said this was not on offer.
One of the first uses of the network will be smart electricity meters. This is the first step toward smart electricity grids that will allow electricity supply to be matched more efficiently to real-time demand.
“We see that as the first of many smart applications, starting in Cambridge, but spreading out to other cities.” Mr. Collinson would not say which cities were next, but did say there would be announcements about a city in North America and one in Asia.

smarterplanet:

Striiv, a smart pedometer that uses game mechanics to motivate people, is getting updated Wednesday with a new personal wireless connection that lets users encourage and compete with each other. With the new Striiv Connected social component, Striiv is moving beyond a more solo experience and utilizing relationships to help further drive users.

With the updated Striiv, users will be able to connect over a personal wireless network that works over unlicensed spectrum for a short distance. When connected, users can exchange their personal best and averages and issue activity challenges with Striiv Energy or real prizes like chores or coffee awarded to the winner. The activities can be conducted together or separately with the winner determined when the two devices are synced. Users will also get bonus points or a trophy for that day when they beat a friends average or personal best. Striiv Connected will work with existing Striiv devices though at a shorter range.

Posted at 2:49am and tagged with: technology, internet of things, location, tech, sensors, health,.

smarterplanet:

Tsubuyaku Sensor is a new wireless device from Japanese Ubiquitous Computing Technology that monitors conditions such as temperature, humidity and radiation levels and automatically tweets the resulting data via Twitter.

If Twitter can be used to broadcast recipesschool lunch menus and fresh bread alerts — to name just a few of the many examples we’ve covered — then why not environmental data as well? That, indeed, is just what’s possible with the Tsubuyaku Sensor, a new wireless device from Japanese Ubiquitous Computing Technology that monitors conditions such as temperature, humidity and radiation levels and automatically tweets the resulting data via Twitter.

Targeted primarily at applications including food warehouses and wine cellars, the Tsubuyaku Sensor measures data including temperature, humidity or radiation levels and can then automatically broadcast it to Twitter, according to a recent TechCrunch report. Boasting a battery life of about a year when posts are made every minute, the device features a range of about 40 meters, though a repeater option is available to extend that further. Twitter broadcasts can be set for public or private viewing. Pricing is USD 560 for the base unit and USD 286 for each sensor.

Is there any end to the remote monitoring possibilities? We’re thinking not. One for inspiration!

More info here and here.

Posted at 1:50pm and tagged with: data, sensors, tech, technology, internet of things,.

smarterplanet:

Open data heralds the internet’s next exciting phase

Considered one of the pioneering fathers of the internet, Berners-Lee believes we are only at the dawn of an even more exciting era - the era of open data and the semantic web, where almost every feasible physical device or piece of data will…

Posted at 6:31am and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface, internet of things,.

smarterplanet:

Your next mayor: a computer | KurzweilAI

In May 2009, some residents of Paris were given La Montre Verte (“The Green Watch”). The watch is actually a watch, and it also has two sensors to detect noise levels and ozone levels, a GPS chip, and a Bluetooth chip. As people went about their day, the watch recorded the noise and ozone in their environment. The data was transferred to a companion mobile phone application, regularly uploaded to a central server, and crunched into maps like this. (Credit: Fing)

“Almost anything — any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small — can become digitally aware and networked,” said IBM Chairman Samuel J. Palmisano at the 2010 SmarterCities forum in Shanghai. “Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and instrumented things — cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines …”

Posted at 9:10pm and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, sensors, networks, data,.

smarterplanet:

Your next mayor: a computer | KurzweilAI
In May 2009, some residents of Paris were given La Montre Verte (“The Green Watch”). The watch is actually a watch, and it also has two sensors to detect noise levels and ozone levels, a GPS chip, and a Bluetooth chip. As people went about their day, the watch recorded the noise and ozone in their environment. The data was transferred to a companion mobile phone application, regularly uploaded to a central server, and crunched into maps like this. (Credit: Fing)
“Almost anything — any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small — can become digitally aware and networked,” said IBM Chairman Samuel J. Palmisano at the 2010 SmarterCities forum in Shanghai. “Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and instrumented things — cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines …”

springwise:

Trackers embedded in athlete’s apparel provide live in-game data for coaches

Devices that help athletes monitor their performance have been around for a while and are starting to encompass a range of sports – we recently reported on the Swimtag wristband, which acts as a training aid for those heading to the pool. Taking the concept one step further, adidas is set to test its miCoach performance-tracking system on world-class soccer players during a live game in July. READ MORE…

Posted at 10:09am and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, sensors,.

springwise:

Trackers embedded in athlete’s apparel provide live in-game data for coaches
Devices that help athletes monitor their performance have been around for a while and are starting to encompass a range of sports – we recently reported on the Swimtag wristband, which acts as a training aid for those heading to the pool. Taking the concept one step further, adidas is set to test its miCoach performance-tracking system on world-class soccer players during a live game in July. READ MORE…

techspotlight:

Broadcom has just rolled out a chip for smart phones that promises to indicate location ultra-precisely, possibly within a few centimeters, vertically and horizontally, indoors and out.

The unprecedented accuracy of the Broadcom 4752 chip results from the sheer breadth of sensors from which it can process information. It can receive signals from global navigation satellites, cell-phone towers, and Wi-Fi hot spots, and also input from gyroscopes, accelerometers, step counters, and altimeters.

The variety of location data available to mobile-device makers means that in our increasingly radio-frequency-dense world, location services will continue to become more refined.

In theory, the new chip can even determine what floor of a building you’re on, thanks to its ability to integrate information from the atmospheric pressure sensor on many models of Android phones. The company calls abilities like this “ubiquitous navigation,” and the idea is that it will enable a new kind of e-commerce predicated on the fact that shopkeepers will know the moment you walk by their front door, or when you are looking at a particular product, and can offer you coupons at that instant.

Posted at 6:28am and tagged with: location, tech, technology, internet of things, smartphone,.

Cars in the Cloud: Trackable and Time-Stamped

When an aircraft crashes, investigators are able to retrieve useful information about what went wrong from the flight data recorder, more commonly known as the black box. (The data recorder itself is actually not black, not until it’s retrieved from charred remains.) Statistically speaking, plane crashes are rare occurrences compared to car crashes, so why not install a black box for cars?

That’s exactly what Japanese telemetrics company Crew Systems developed: a driving data recorder for cars and trucks. A big market exists for these in Japan, since businesses with more than five vehicles are required by law to produce daily reports on the driving habits of their drivers.

Full Story: Wired

Posted at 5:28pm and tagged with: transport, data, tech, technology, internet of things,.

Cars in the Cloud: Trackable and Time-Stamped


When an aircraft crashes, investigators are able to retrieve useful information about what went wrong from the flight data recorder, more commonly known as the black box. (The data recorder itself is actually not black, not until it’s retrieved from charred remains.) Statistically speaking, plane crashes are rare occurrences compared to car crashes, so why not install a black box for cars?
That’s exactly what Japanese telemetrics company Crew Systems developed: a driving data recorder for cars and trucks. A big market exists for these in Japan, since businesses with more than five vehicles are required by law to produce daily reports on the driving habits of their drivers.
Full Story: Wired

The Computing Trend that Will Change Everything

Computing isn’t just getting cheaper. It’s becoming more energy efficient. That means a world populated by ubiquitous sensors and streams of nanodata.

Full Story: Technology Review

Posted at 3:37pm and tagged with: tech, trends, technology, computers, internet of things,.

The Computing Trend that Will Change Everything


Computing isn’t just getting cheaper. It’s becoming more energy efficient. That means a world populated by ubiquitous sensors and streams of nanodata.

Full Story: Technology Review

A multitouch floor could one day detect your heart attack

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently granted a patent to IBM for a security systems that would turn a floor into a multitouch surface that recognizes who’s standing on it. The floor senses different shapes and weights, so it would know the difference between adults, children and pets by weight and shape and number of feet on the floor. It has a database of registered identities to which it could match the shapes and weights it detects. Once it senses an unauthorized person standing on it, it can sound alarms or call the police, just like traditional house alarms. IBM received the patent, No. 8,138,882, on March 20.


Full Story: Impact Lab

Posted at 10:11am and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, sensors, health,.

A multitouch floor could one day detect your heart attack

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office recently granted a patent to IBM for a security systems that would turn a floor into a multitouch surface that recognizes who’s standing on it. The floor senses different shapes and weights, so it would know the difference between adults, children and pets by weight and shape and number of feet on the floor. It has a database of registered identities to which it could match the shapes and weights it detects. Once it senses an unauthorized person standing on it, it can sound alarms or call the police, just like traditional house alarms. IBM received the patent, No. 8,138,882, on March 20.

Full Story: Impact Lab