Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.
94% of adults with post-graduate degrees are online, but 57% of those without high school diplomas remain offline.

futurejournalismproject:

What Happens in an Internet Minute

Via Intel:

In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 uploaded on Flickr. At least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world. And more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora while more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube.

All in all, that’s 625 terabytes of information sloshing about the tubes each minute.

If we do some math that’s 878.9 petabytes per day which is a bit difficult to wrap our mind around.

But if we convert that to the universal measurement of the MP3, we get the equivalent of about 235.9 billion songs passing through the internet and mobile networks each day.

Posted at 8:22am and tagged with: tech, technology, internet, trends,.

futurejournalismproject:

What Happens in an Internet Minute
Via Intel:

In just one minute, more than 204 million emails are sent. Amazon rings up about $83,000 in sales. Around 20 million photos are viewed and 3,000 uploaded on Flickr. At least 6 million Facebook pages are viewed around the world. And more than 61,000 hours of music are played on Pandora while more than 1.3 million video clips are watched on YouTube.

All in all, that’s 625 terabytes of information sloshing about the tubes each minute.
If we do some math that’s 878.9 petabytes per day which is a bit difficult to wrap our mind around.
But if we convert that to the universal measurement of the MP3, we get the equivalent of about 235.9 billion songs passing through the internet and mobile networks each day.

searchengineland:

Reports: Google CPCs Continue To Decline And Yahoo/Bing’s Rise While Spend Overall Grows In Q1

Recently released reports by Efficient Frontier, RKG and Covario give insight into how paid search did in the last quarter, and predict what spending might look like for the rest of the year to come.

Posted at 2:49am and tagged with: tech, technology, internet, search, trends,.

infoneer-pulse:

Millions of Internet users in Iran could soon be permanently cut off from the Web, social networks, and e-mail.

In a statement released last week, Reza Taghipour, the Iranian minister for Information and Communications Technology, announced it plans to establish a national intranet within five months in an effort to create a “clean Internet,” according to an International Business Times report. “All Internet Service Providers (ISP) should only present National Internet by August,” Taghipour said in the statement.

» via CNET

Posted at 12:00pm and tagged with: politics, tech, technology, internet,.

The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Killed Reading Books, Show Them This Chart

"Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. 

Well, that time never existed. Check out these stats from Gallup surveys. In 1957, not even a quarter of Americans were reading a book or novel. By 2005, that number had shot up to 47 percent. I couldn’t find a more recent number, but I think it’s fair to say that reading probably hasn’t declined to the horrific levels of the 1950s.”


Full Story: Atlantic

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: reading, tech, technology, internet, attention,.

The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Killed Reading Books, Show Them This Chart


"Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. Well, that time never existed. Check out these stats from Gallup surveys. In 1957, not even a quarter of Americans were reading a book or novel. By 2005, that number had shot up to 47 percent. I couldn’t find a more recent number, but I think it’s fair to say that reading probably hasn’t declined to the horrific levels of the 1950s.”

Full Story: Atlantic

theatlantic:

What If Your Emails Never Went to Gmail and Twitter Couldn’t See Your Tweets?

A new tool under development by Oregon State computer scientists could radically alter the way that communications work on the web. Privly is a sort of manifesto-in-code, a working argument for a more private, less permanent Internet. 

The system we have now gives all the power to the service providers. That seemed to be necessary, but Privly shows that it is not: Users could have a lot more power without giving up social networking. Just pointing that out is a valuable contribution to the ongoing struggle to understand and come up with better ways of sharing and protecting ourselves online. 

“Companies like Twitter, Google, and Facebook make you choose between modern technology and privacy. But the Privly developers know this to be false choice,” lead dev Sean McGregor says in the video below. “You can communicate through the site of your choosing without giving the host access to your content.”

Through browser extensions, Privly allows you to post to social networks and send email without letting those services see “into” your text. Instead, your actual words get encrypted and then routed to Privlys servers (or an eventual peer-to-peer network). What the social media site “sees” is merely a link that Privly expands in your browser into the full content. Of course, this requires that people who want to see your content also need Privly installed on their machines.

Read more.

Posted at 3:41pm and tagged with: tech, technology, privacy, internet, assumptions,.

Posted at 1:15pm and tagged with: tech, technology, internet, art,.

Everything makes a sound.

Comics Are Now Selling Laughs by the Download



Stand-up comedians of a certain era knew they had arrived when Johnny Carson invited them to a desk-side seat on “The Tonight Show.” A generation later, the gold standard was getting a solo comedy special on HBO. But in the Internet era, the yardstick for success has been redefined.


Full Story: New York Times

Posted at 3:41pm and tagged with: internet, attention, disruption,.

Comics Are Now Selling Laughs by the Download


Stand-up comedians of a certain era knew they had arrived when Johnny Carson invited them to a desk-side seat on “The Tonight Show.” A generation later, the gold standard was getting a solo comedy special on HBO. But in the Internet era, the yardstick for success has been redefined.

Full Story: New York Times

cnet:

Internet Explorer resumed growth in browser usage in March, reversing a years-long slide

Article

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: internet, tech, technology, trends,.

cnet:

Internet Explorer resumed growth in browser usage in March, reversing a years-long slide
Article

THE FUTURE OF MOBILE
Alex Cocotas and Henry Blodget, businessinsider.com

Yes­ter­day, we host­ed our IGNI­TION WEST: Future of Mobile con­fer­ence in San Fran­cis­co.

To kick off the con­fer­ence, our BI Intel­li­gence team—Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, Alex Coco­tas, and I—put togeth­er a deck on the cur­rent…

Posted at 1:14pm and tagged with: tech, technology, tablets, smartphones, internet, trends, prediction,.


THE FUTURE OF MOBILE Alex Cocotas and Henry Blodget, businessinsider.com
Yes­ter­day, we host­ed our IGNI­TION WEST: Future of Mobile con­fer­ence in San Fran­cis­co.
To kick off the con­fer­ence, our BI Intel­li­gence team—Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry, Alex Coco­tas, and I—put togeth­er a deck on the cur­rent…