Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

futurescope:

Nanotech coating keeps out the water, but not the air

Spanish nanotech company TECNAN is offering a nanoparticle-based coating that repels liquid, yet still allows the underlying material to breathe.

The hydrophobic coating, known as TECNADIS, is made by suspending nanoparticles in a liquid carrier – the identity of those particles is a trade secret, although by altering their concentration, the properties of the coating can be fine-tuned for different applications. When applied to materials such as concrete, ceramic, brick, stone or wood, TECNADIS causes any liquid subsequently applied to them to bead up and roll off instead of soaking in. It doesn’t completely seal their pores, however, so air can still pass in and out of them, minimizing moisture retention-related problems such as mold.

The coating is completely transparent, and reportedly won’t change the color or surface texture of materials. It stands up to regular cleaning methods, along with UV light exposure, and is said to remain effective for over ten years.

[read more] [TECNAN]

Posted at 4:29am and tagged with: Tech, Technology, Nanotechnology,.

joshbyard:

Researchers Using Bio-Engineered Viruses to Power Nano Electronics

The researchers looked to viruses as a new material to work with because they reproduce rapidly and align far better than other materials, making them good candidates to accumulate a charge on one end of the virus.

The researchers then genetically engineered the virus with proteins that enhance the buildup of charge on the ends of the rod-shaped viruses. The viruses only attack other bacteria so are considered benign.  The viruses are stacked onto thin films and then several thin films are layered to build up as much voltage as possible.

The Lawrence Berkeley Lab group isn’t the first to pursue viruses as a means for building up electric charge. Researchers at MIT in 2009 said they were able to wire a charge-building virus to a lithium ion battery. The Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s prototype was only able to generate about a quarter of the voltage of a triple A battery, but they believe that their approach to “viral electronics” can scale up.

(via Step on it: Virus could lead to motion-powered gadgets | Cutting Edge - CNET News)

Posted at 7:21pm and tagged with: technology, biotechnology, nanotechnology, energy,.

joshbyard:

Researchers Using Bio-Engineered Viruses to Power Nano Electronics

The researchers looked to viruses as a new material to work with because they reproduce rapidly and align far better than other materials, making them good candidates to accumulate a charge on one end of the virus.
The researchers then genetically engineered the virus with proteins that enhance the buildup of charge on the ends of the rod-shaped viruses. The viruses only attack other bacteria so are considered benign.  The viruses are stacked onto thin films and then several thin films are layered to build up as much voltage as possible.
The Lawrence Berkeley Lab group isn’t the first to pursue viruses as a means for building up electric charge. Researchers at MIT in 2009 said they were able to wire a charge-building virus to a lithium ion battery. The Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s prototype was only able to generate about a quarter of the voltage of a triple A battery, but they believe that their approach to “viral electronics” can scale up.

(via Step on it: Virus could lead to motion-powered gadgets | Cutting Edge - CNET News)

springwise:

From Japan, underwear uses nanotechnology to help combat body odor

We’ve already seen fabrics that purify the air and tags that neutralize body odors, so it seems only natural that the next step should be undergarments made from such materials. Sure enough, new from Japanese firm Goldwin is MXP underwear, a new line of underclothes based on a fabric that uses nanotechnology to combat body odor. READ MORE…

Posted at 5:32pm and tagged with: technology, nanotechnology, tech,.

springwise:

From Japan, underwear uses nanotechnology to help combat body odor
We’ve already seen fabrics that purify the air and tags that neutralize body odors, so it seems only natural that the next step should be undergarments made from such materials. Sure enough, new from Japanese firm Goldwin is MXP underwear, a new line of underclothes based on a fabric that uses nanotechnology to combat body odor. READ MORE…

smarterplanet:

 MIT Engineers Design Fog-Free, Water-Repellent, Anti-Glare Glass

A new type of nano-structured glass can bounce water and dirt off its surface, cleaning itself and preventing fogging, according to MIT researchers. It eliminates glare, too, allowing light to penetrate with pure clarity. It could be used for anything from solar panels to future car windshields to new gadget screens. […]

[read more] [paper]

Posted at 5:31pm and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface, nanotechnology,.

climateadaptation:

Boron-treated carbon nanotubes soak up oil from water repeatedly

Researchers at Rice University and Penn State University have discovered that adding a dash of boron to carbon while creating nanotubes turns them into solid, spongy, reusable blocks that have an astounding ability to absorb oil spilled in water. […]

The blocks are both superhydrophobic (they hate water, so they float really well) and oleophilic (they love oil). The nanosponges, which are more than 99 percent air, also conduct electricity and can easily be manipulated with magnets. […] He then put a match to the material, burned off the oil and returned the sponge to the water to absorb more. The robust sponge can be used repeatedly and stands up to abuse; he said a sample remained elastic after about 10,000 compressions in the lab. The sponge can also store the oil for later retrieval, he said.

“These samples can be made pretty large and can be easily scaled up,” said Hashim, holding a half-inch square block of billions of nanotubes. “They’re super-low density, so the available volume is large. That’s why the uptake of oil can be so high.” He said the sponges described in the paper can absorb more than a hundred times their weight in oil. […]

“Oil-spill remediation and environmental cleanup are just the beginning of how useful these new nanotube materials could be,” added. “For example, we could use these materials to make more efficient and lighter batteries. We could use them as scaffolds for bone-tissue regeneration. We even could impregnate the nanotube sponge with polymers to fabricate robust and light composites for the automobile and plane industries.” […]

[via] [more] [paper]

Posted at 7:21pm and tagged with: tech, technology, nanotechnology, environment,.

As demand for renewable energy increases, wind turbine blades are increasing in size, leading to longer blades that can achieve larger swept areas. Yet, gravity-induced bending loads on blades create dramatic increases in dynamic stress, heightening market demand for a material that reduces blade mass while retaining strength.

Posted at 9:09pm and tagged with: nanotechnology, energy, Environment,.

NANOTUBE TECHNOLOGY LEADING TO FAST, LOWER-COST MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS

The new findings have almost tripled the speed of prototype nano-biosensors, and should find applications not only in medicine but in toxicology, environmental monitoring, new drug development and other fields.

Full Story: Oregon Uni

Posted at 1:50pm and tagged with: nanotechnology, health, Biotechnology, tech, technology,.

NANOTUBE TECHNOLOGY LEADING TO FAST, LOWER-COST MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS

The new findings have almost tripled the speed of prototype nano-biosensors, and should find applications not only in medicine but in toxicology, environmental monitoring, new drug development and other fields.
Full Story: Oregon Uni

New Ability to Regrow Blood Vessels Holds Promise for Treatment of Heart Disease

The treatment method developed by Cockrell School of Engineering Assistant Professor Aaron Baker could allow doctors to bypass surgery and instead repair damaged blood vessels simply by injecting a lipid-incased substance into a patient. Once inside the body, the substance stimulates cell growth and spurs the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones.


Full Story: University of Texas

Posted at 12:00pm and tagged with: nanotechnology, tech, technology, biotech, Biotechnology, health,.

New Ability to Regrow Blood Vessels Holds Promise for Treatment of Heart Disease


The treatment method developed by Cockrell School of Engineering Assistant Professor Aaron Baker could allow doctors to bypass surgery and instead repair damaged blood vessels simply by injecting a lipid-incased substance into a patient. Once inside the body, the substance stimulates cell growth and spurs the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones.

Full Story: University of Texas

smarterplanet:

Carbon nanotubes can double growth of cell cultures important in industry | KurzweilAI

A dose of carbon nanotubes more than doubles the growth rate of plant cell cultures — workhorses in the production of everything from lifesaving medications to sweeteners to dyes and perfumes — researchers at the University of Arkansas report.

Their study is the first to show that carbon nanotubes boost plant cell division and growth.

Their previous research demonstrated that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can penetrate through the thick coatings on seeds, stimulate germination of the seeds and stimulate the growth of certain plants.

Posted at 3:41pm and tagged with: nanotechnology, biotecnology,.

smarterplanet:

Carbon nanotubes can double growth of cell cultures important in industry | KurzweilAI
A dose of carbon nanotubes more than doubles the growth rate of plant cell cultures — workhorses in the production of everything from lifesaving medications to sweeteners to dyes and perfumes — researchers at the University of Arkansas report.
Their study is the first to show that carbon nanotubes boost plant cell division and growth.
Their previous research demonstrated that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can penetrate through the thick coatings on seeds, stimulate germination of the seeds and stimulate the growth of certain plants.