Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

smarterplanet:

Leathernext: Marines Want Better Networks, Sensors — And Terminator Vision | Danger Room | Wired.com

The Marines of the future are all about communication.

The Leathernecks want data networks that can keep them connected all the way from the decks of their ships to the beaches they storm. They want online search tools that rely on natural language instead of keywords (like the rest of us). And they want software that can sift through the oceans of data their wartime sensors and cameras collect — including tools that can scan through faces in a crowd, like the Terminator, and alert Marines to danger.

That’s according to the Corps’ blueprint for its science and technology needs over the next 20 years. Communications are a big, gaping hole for the Marines of the present, and the Marines want to hand their successors more seamless, networked ways of talking. That’s on top of other wish-list material, like advanced sensors that can sniff drugs and homemade bombs — oh, and laser-stopping goggles.

The blueprint (.pdf), first published by Inside Defense, doesn’t come out and criticize the Corps’ current suite of communications tools and sensors. But there’s a yawning technological chasm in-between the present-day Marines and where the Leathernecks want to be in 2025.

From “flagpole to fighting hole,” the blueprint writes, Marines need to be in constant communication: “The objective is to provide a holistic, end-to-end, turnkey [command-and-control] capability to execute commander’s intent, facilitate implicit communications, visualize battlespace reality, promote initiative, enable centralized command and decentralized control, and ultimately accomplish the mission.”

Posted at 4:40am and tagged with: tech, technology, networks, military,.

smarterplanet:

Leathernext: Marines Want Better Networks, Sensors — And Terminator Vision | Danger Room | Wired.com
The Marines of the future are all about communication.
The Leathernecks want data networks that can keep them connected all the way from the decks of their ships to the beaches they storm. They want online search tools that rely on natural language instead of keywords (like the rest of us). And they want software that can sift through the oceans of data their wartime sensors and cameras collect — including tools that can scan through faces in a crowd, like the Terminator, and alert Marines to danger.
That’s according to the Corps’ blueprint for its science and technology needs over the next 20 years. Communications are a big, gaping hole for the Marines of the present, and the Marines want to hand their successors more seamless, networked ways of talking. That’s on top of other wish-list material, like advanced sensors that can sniff drugs and homemade bombs — oh, and laser-stopping goggles.
The blueprint (.pdf), first published by Inside Defense, doesn’t come out and criticize the Corps’ current suite of communications tools and sensors. But there’s a yawning technological chasm in-between the present-day Marines and where the Leathernecks want to be in 2025.
From “flagpole to fighting hole,” the blueprint writes, Marines need to be in constant communication: “The objective is to provide a holistic, end-to-end, turnkey [command-and-control] capability to execute commander’s intent, facilitate implicit communications, visualize battlespace reality, promote initiative, enable centralized command and decentralized control, and ultimately accomplish the mission.”

smarterplanet:

Microsoft Research wants to automate your house, introduces HomeOS — Engadget

Ever wondered if you could control your house’s climate, security, and appliances — along with your PCs and peripherals — using Microsoft software? That day may soon dawn, as its Research arm has started testing its home automation software, called HomeOS, in twelve domiciles over the past few months. The budding system views smartphones, printers and air conditioners as network peripherals, controlled by a dedicated gateway computer. The project even has a handful of apps in play, which perform functions like energy monitoring, remote surveillance and face-recognition. This growing list of applications, available through a portal called “HomeStore”, will allow users to easily expand their system’s capabilities. So how does it all work out in the real world? Head past the break, and let Redmond’s research team give you the skinny.

Posted at 9:11pm and tagged with: tech, technology, networks,.

smarterplanet:

Microsoft Research wants to automate your house, introduces HomeOS — Engadget
Ever wondered if you could control your house’s climate, security, and appliances — along with your PCs and peripherals — using Microsoft software? That day may soon dawn, as its Research arm has started testing its home automation software, called HomeOS, in twelve domiciles over the past few months. The budding system views smartphones, printers and air conditioners as network peripherals, controlled by a dedicated gateway computer. The project even has a handful of apps in play, which perform functions like energy monitoring, remote surveillance and face-recognition. This growing list of applications, available through a portal called “HomeStore”, will allow users to easily expand their system’s capabilities. So how does it all work out in the real world? Head past the break, and let Redmond’s research team give you the skinny.
April 28, 2012 at 03:40AM via http://bit.ly/IBwpB8 (via stoweboyd)

Posted at 4:41am and tagged with: education, connected, tech, technology, networks,.

@catherinecronin: Great post by @sharonlflynn on #pelc12: All about connections http://t.co/SRof1EoU « happy to be a part of them, Sharon :)

smarterplanet:

Adjusting to Life in a Hyperconnected World

In the spring of 1997, during a presentation in Paris on IBM’s new e-business strategy, the CIO of a major European retail chain mentioned that his company had just spent a lot of money remodeling their stores.  He was wondering if they had done the right thing, given all this new economy talk.  We were in the middle of the dot-com frenzy, and the buzz in the air was that in the Internet-based new economy, brick-and-mortar businesses, like other businesses grounded in the physical world, could not possibly compete in this fast-moving digital space and were therefore headed for extinction. 

Similar questions were being raised all around us.  In my local library, in whose advisory council I have been serving since those days, we were making plans to leverage the new Internet capabilities, such as introducing an online catalog and providing wireless Internet access in the library building.  But we were also wondering if a library building would be needed at all in the future, given the growing digitization of books, music, videos and just about all content. 

As it has turned out, the Internet, along with the overall digital revolution has proven to be a transformation of truehistorical proportions, propelling us from the industrial society of the past two centuries to a new kind of information society and knowledge-based economy.  But, it has not quite worked out the way some predicted back in those dot-com bubble days.

The physical world continues to be alive and well.  No one is asking questions about the viability of cities, given that people can now work and shop virtually.  To the contrary, urbanization is one of the biggest trends of the 21st century.  According to the UN Population Division, more people now live in urban areas than in rural areas.  That proportion will rise to over over 60 percent by 2030, and close to 70 percent by 2050.  Over the next four decades, all the world’s population growth will take place in urban areas, in addition to the continuing migration of the rural population to cities. 

Furthermore, the Web has evolved toward its Web 2.0social networking phase.  And, these social networking capabilities have reminded us that humans are inherently social.  We get together, establish communities and organize into a wide variety of institutions to get things done more effectively.  We like to communicate, share ideas and learn from each other. 

(read more on Irving’s blog)

Posted at 3:41pm and tagged with: tech, technology, networks, connected,.

theatlantic:

Infographics Say It All in Facebook’s Latest SEC Filing

In the amendment Facebook filed Monday to its S-1 SEC filing, some of the best information about the company is embedded in the infographics it used to illustrate its points. They show a company that’s booming, with rampant growth of users and revenue, but they also show a behemoth that’s saturated much of the globe save for one glaringly dark patch where China sits. […]

Look at the mass of darkness where China is located, the stark border of Russia, the largely un-Facebook penetrated Africa, and the bright slash of Indonesia (at one point,Indonesian became the most-used Asian language on Facebook). That dislocation between population and Facebook users bears out some of the projections the company follows with in its filing, in particular its expansion plans.

Read more at The Atlantic Wire. [Image: Facebook]

Posted at 10:11am and tagged with: trends, social media, networks, connected, tech, technology,.

theatlantic:

Infographics Say It All in Facebook’s Latest SEC Filing

In the amendment Facebook filed Monday to its S-1 SEC filing, some of the best information about the company is embedded in the infographics it used to illustrate its points. They show a company that’s booming, with rampant growth of users and revenue, but they also show a behemoth that’s saturated much of the globe save for one glaringly dark patch where China sits. […]
Look at the mass of darkness where China is located, the stark border of Russia, the largely un-Facebook penetrated Africa, and the bright slash of Indonesia (at one point,Indonesian became the most-used Asian language on Facebook). That dislocation between population and Facebook users bears out some of the projections the company follows with in its filing, in particular its expansion plans.
Read more at The Atlantic Wire. [Image: Facebook]

smarterplanet:

Your next mayor: a computer | KurzweilAI

In May 2009, some residents of Paris were given La Montre Verte (“The Green Watch”). The watch is actually a watch, and it also has two sensors to detect noise levels and ozone levels, a GPS chip, and a Bluetooth chip. As people went about their day, the watch recorded the noise and ozone in their environment. The data was transferred to a companion mobile phone application, regularly uploaded to a central server, and crunched into maps like this. (Credit: Fing)

“Almost anything — any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small — can become digitally aware and networked,” said IBM Chairman Samuel J. Palmisano at the 2010 SmarterCities forum in Shanghai. “Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and instrumented things — cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines …”

Posted at 9:10pm and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, sensors, networks, data,.

smarterplanet:

Your next mayor: a computer | KurzweilAI
In May 2009, some residents of Paris were given La Montre Verte (“The Green Watch”). The watch is actually a watch, and it also has two sensors to detect noise levels and ozone levels, a GPS chip, and a Bluetooth chip. As people went about their day, the watch recorded the noise and ozone in their environment. The data was transferred to a companion mobile phone application, regularly uploaded to a central server, and crunched into maps like this. (Credit: Fing)
“Almost anything — any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small — can become digitally aware and networked,” said IBM Chairman Samuel J. Palmisano at the 2010 SmarterCities forum in Shanghai. “Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and instrumented things — cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines …”

futurejournalismproject:

The Internet’s Population Doubled Over the Last Five Years

Royal Pingdom susses out some interesting trends about the world’s 2.27 billion Internet users:

  • Africa has gone from 34 million to 140 million, a 317% increase.
  • Asia has gone from 418 million to over 1 billion, a 143% increase.
  • Europe has gone from 322 million to 501 million, a 56% increase.
  • The Middle East has gone from 20 to 77 million, a 294% increase.
  • North America has gone from 233 to 273 million, a 17% increase.
  • Latin America (South & Central America) has gone from 110 to 236 million, a 114% increase.
  • Oceania (including Australia) has gone from 19 to 24 million, a 27% increase.

They also note that Asia’s Internet population is almost as large* the entire Internet population was in 2007.

*My original post stated that Asia’s Internet population was almost double, not almost as large. Thanks to Anna for catching that.

Posted at 5:31pm and tagged with: trends, technology, internet, networks, globalisation,.

Posted at 7:21pm and tagged with: business models, future, networks,.

The kids who grew up inside AOL chat rooms and came of age on Facebook have an intuitive understanding of the power of networks that our generation will never have. They are not asking us to fix the problems we left them with. They are asking us not to get in their way as they try to dig themselves out. I think we owe them that.

The Digital Grid Consortium, which was officially founded in September and includes NEC among its members, said Monday it will build experimental systems next year, and aims to launch large grid services to try out the concept after three years.

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: energy, innovation, networks,.