Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

Mr Donaldson and Mr Cuomo [of MITRE] hired two social network analysis researchers from Babson College, Salvatore Parise and Bala Iyer, to ascertain where information flowed most swiftly and became more valuable, and what people, behaviors and tools most aided that performance, they told the Ivey Business Journal. They discovered that their technology-mediated networks emboldened individuals to share more widely.

The “Aha” moment was recognising that their tools enabled some to become “brokers” between different groups in other parts of the organisation. “Collaboration” author Morton Hansen dubs such brokers “T-shaped” for their deep knowledge ( illustrated by the vertical line in the “T”) and strong interest in collaborating across domains (the horizontal line). As Scott Page explains in ”The Difference”, a book about how we can think smarter in groups, our most valuable talent thrives on working with diverse people. A talent-centered ecosystem tends to accelerate value for the firm and external parties that are participants in the ecosystem.

Posted at 6:34am and tagged with: networks, collaboration, social media,.

Ford’s unveils “talking” cars


 Ford is showing off some high-tech features that warn drivers when there is danger ahead. The auto giant, with two large factories in Louisville, says while other car companies are developing similar technologies, it is the first company to have prototype vehicles.

Full Story: WDRB

Posted at 4:18am and tagged with: tech, technology, transport, networks,.

Ford’s unveils “talking” cars

 Ford is showing off some high-tech features that warn drivers when there is danger ahead. The auto giant, with two large factories in Louisville, says while other car companies are developing similar technologies, it is the first company to have prototype vehicles.
Full Story: WDRB

futuresagency:

From Stowe Boyd’s blog: “The industrial influence in business management and theory is profound. In essence, for the past hundred years business has been objectified as a machine, divided into various components, like a clock or an electric generator. Components are composed of subcomponents,…

Posted at 2:10pm and tagged with: Business Process, Knowledge Management, Stowe Boyd, social networking, work, networks,.

Smart post addressing some of the downsides of “frictionless” sharing. (via arainert)

Posted at 4:45pm and tagged with: networks, data, social media, attention,.

If everything is shared automatically, nothing has significance.

A Twitter analysis of political tweets - the networks and the cross over

Interesting

Original Story: Wall Street Journal

Posted at 4:22am and tagged with: politics, social media, tech, technology, networks,.

A Twitter analysis of political tweets - the networks and the cross over

Interesting

Original Story: Wall Street Journal

smarterplanet:

Duke Energy embraces cellular for smart grid | GigaOM

Duke Energy is turning to cellular networks as the backbone for its smart grid. The utility detailed the network plan in a white paper released earlier this month, and revealed one of the most aggressive uses of cellular networks by the utility industry in the U.S.

In the white paper Duke Energy’s Manager of Technology Development David Masters wrote that Duke plans to invest $1 billion into digital grid technologies, and the utility decided to rely heavily on already available networks like cellular connections for a variety of reasons. These reasons include: cellular networks are based on existing standards that have been used extensively, carriers will continue to invest in the network infrastructure to the benefit of the utility, and carriers use Internet Protocol as the transport layer. In addition, one of the most compelling reasons Masters writes:

Duke Energy has no desire to be in the communications business. We need to harness already- existing expertise and capabilities that the cellular networks provide in designing, building, and maintaining the communications.

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: Duke Energy, cellular network, digital grid, energy, smartgrid, wireless, tech, technology, networks,.

smarterplanet:

Duke Energy embraces cellular for smart grid | GigaOM
Duke Energy is turning to cellular networks as the backbone for its  smart grid. The utility detailed the network plan in a white paper released earlier this month, and revealed one of the most aggressive uses of cellular networks by the utility industry in the U.S.
In the white paper Duke Energy’s Manager of Technology Development  David Masters wrote that Duke plans to invest $1 billion into digital  grid technologies, and the utility decided to rely heavily on already  available networks like cellular connections for a variety of reasons.  These reasons include: cellular networks are based on existing standards  that have been used extensively, carriers will continue to invest in  the network infrastructure to the benefit of the utility, and carriers  use Internet Protocol as the transport layer. In addition, one of the  most compelling reasons Masters writes:

Duke Energy has no desire to be in the communications  business. We need to harness already- existing expertise and  capabilities that the cellular networks provide in designing, building,  and maintaining the communications.

Tracking Every Pill, Every Piece Of Food – The Internet Of Things Cometh

 IBM is developing the software that, in conjunction with barcodes, GPS sensors, and environmental controls, could help us ensure that every drug we take came from the manufacturers we trust and in the condition they required. It’s the Internet of Thingsfor prescription drugs, and it could save lives and streamline inventory all over the world

Full Story: Singularity Hub

Posted at 4:40am and tagged with: health, technology, internet, networks, monitoring,.


Tracking Every Pill, Every Piece Of Food – The Internet Of Things Cometh


 IBM is developing the software that, in conjunction with barcodes, GPS sensors, and environmental controls, could help us ensure that every drug we take came from the manufacturers we trust and in the condition they required. It’s the Internet of Thingsfor prescription drugs, and it could save lives and streamline inventory all over the world

Full Story: Singularity Hub

Paul Higgins: Good Point. 

outcastsnack:

There is an old study that showed that anytime there were changes to the work environment, productivity increased for a while, and then declined to previous levels or lower. It was found that workers responded to the perception of interest by management, not the actual stimulus introduced. One wonders if this is perhaps the case here. As they say, more research is necessary. A longitudinal study would be great. I don’t think it’s on the company’s website - but I could be wrong. Very very interesting though!

stoweboyd:

Short piece from last year on work that Alexander Pentland is doing at MIT. One project maps how people interact at work:

Andy Greenberg, Mining Human Behavior At MIT

Pentland’s lab put sociometers on 80 employees at a Bank of America call center in Rhode Island. The inconspicuous badges used Bluetooth and infrared signals to measure which co-workers the test subjects talked to every minute for a month and, later, another period of six weeks. After the first month the MIT researchers could see that individuals who talked to more co-workers were getting through calls faster, felt less stressed and had the same approval ratings as their peers. Informally talking out problems and solutions, it seemed, produced better results than following the employee handbook or obeying managers’ e-mailed instructions.

So the call center tried its own experiment. Instead of staggering employees’ coffee breaks as it had previously, it aligned their breaks to allow more chatter. The result, Bank of America told MIT a few months later: productivity gains worth about $15 million a year.

Let people form their own denser social networks and — surprise — happiness, knowledge, and better performance follows.

Throw away the manuals, fire the managers, get out of the way: let people figure out how to invent their own work, cooperatively.

Posted at 8:11am and tagged with: work, networks,.

Paul Higgins: Good Point. 

outcastsnack:

There is an old study that showed that anytime there were changes to the work environment, productivity increased for a while, and then declined to previous levels or lower. It was found that workers responded to the perception of interest by management, not the actual stimulus introduced. One wonders if this is perhaps the case here. As they say, more research is necessary. A longitudinal study would be great. I don’t think it’s on the company’s website - but I could be wrong. Very very interesting though!
stoweboyd:

Short piece from last year on work that Alexander Pentland is doing at MIT. One project maps how people interact at work:

Andy Greenberg, Mining Human Behavior At MIT
Pentland’s lab put sociometers on 80 employees at a Bank of America call center in Rhode Island. The inconspicuous badges used  Bluetooth and infrared signals to measure which co-workers the test  subjects talked to every minute for a month and, later, another period  of six weeks. After the first month the MIT researchers could see that  individuals who talked to more co-workers were getting through calls  faster, felt less stressed and had the same approval ratings as their  peers. Informally talking out problems and solutions, it seemed,  produced better results than following the employee handbook or obeying  managers’ e-mailed instructions.
So the call center tried its own  experiment. Instead of staggering employees’ coffee breaks as it had  previously, it aligned their breaks to allow more chatter. The result,  Bank of America told MIT a few months later: productivity gains worth  about $15 million a year.

Let people form their own denser social networks and — surprise — happiness, knowledge, and better performance follows.
Throw away the manuals, fire the managers, get out of the way: let people figure out how to invent their own work, cooperatively.

stoweboyd:

Short piece from last year on work that Alexander Pentland is doing at MIT. One project maps how people interact at work:

Andy Greenberg, Mining Human Behavior At MIT

Pentland’s lab put sociometers on 80 employees at a Bank of America call center in Rhode Island. The inconspicuous badges used Bluetooth and infrared signals to measure which co-workers the test subjects talked to every minute for a month and, later, another period of six weeks. After the first month the MIT researchers could see that individuals who talked to more co-workers were getting through calls faster, felt less stressed and had the same approval ratings as their peers. Informally talking out problems and solutions, it seemed, produced better results than following the employee handbook or obeying managers’ e-mailed instructions.

So the call center tried its own experiment. Instead of staggering employees’ coffee breaks as it had previously, it aligned their breaks to allow more chatter. The result, Bank of America told MIT a few months later: productivity gains worth about $15 million a year.

Let people form their own denser social networks and — surprise — happiness, knowledge, and better performance follows.

Throw away the manuals, fire the managers, get out of the way: let people figure out how to invent their own work, cooperatively.

Posted at 6:22am and tagged with: work, networks,.

stoweboyd:

Short piece from last year on work that Alexander Pentland is doing at MIT. One project maps how people interact at work:

Andy Greenberg, Mining Human Behavior At MIT
Pentland’s lab put sociometers on 80 employees at a Bank of America call center in Rhode Island. The inconspicuous badges used  Bluetooth and infrared signals to measure which co-workers the test  subjects talked to every minute for a month and, later, another period  of six weeks. After the first month the MIT researchers could see that  individuals who talked to more co-workers were getting through calls  faster, felt less stressed and had the same approval ratings as their  peers. Informally talking out problems and solutions, it seemed,  produced better results than following the employee handbook or obeying  managers’ e-mailed instructions.
So the call center tried its own  experiment. Instead of staggering employees’ coffee breaks as it had  previously, it aligned their breaks to allow more chatter. The result,  Bank of America told MIT a few months later: productivity gains worth  about $15 million a year.

Let people form their own denser social networks and — surprise — happiness, knowledge, and better performance follows.
Throw away the manuals, fire the managers, get out of the way: let people figure out how to invent their own work, cooperatively.