Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

“Harvard Library’s Faculty Advisory Council is telling faculty that it’s financially ‘untenable’ for the university to keep on paying extortionate access fees for academic journals. It’s suggesting that faculty make their research publicly available, switch to publishing in open access journals and consider resigning from the boards of journals that don’t allow open access.”

Posted at 8:20am and tagged with: education, tech, technology, open source, disruption,.

Paul Higgins: All for this, greater transparency means people have to be more open and true in what they do. Can only help the rigour of science and research.

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

If you’re a psychologist, the news has to make you a little nervous—particularly if you’re a psychologist who published an article in 2008 in any of these three journals: Psychological Science, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, or the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition.

Because, if you did, someone is going to check your work. A group of researchers have already begun what they’ve dubbed the Reproducibility Project, which aims to replicate every study from those three journals for that one year. The project is part of Open Science Framework, a group interested in scientific values, and its stated mission is to “estimate the reproducibility of a sample of studies from the scientific literature.” This is a more polite way of saying “We want to see how much of what gets published turns out to be bunk.”

» via The Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription may be required for some content)

This is an interesting approach that maybe will force social scientists and others who are active in research disciplines masquerading as science to rethink and create a methodological foundation that fits their own area.

Posted at 8:23am and tagged with: science, open source,.

Wellcome Trust joins ‘academic spring’ to open up science

Wellcome backs campaign to break stranglehold of academic journals and allow all research papers to be shared free online

Full Story: The Guardian

Posted at 4:41am and tagged with: health, science, open source, collaboration,.

Wellcome Trust joins ‘academic spring’ to open up science


Wellcome backs campaign to break stranglehold of academic journals and allow all research papers to be shared free online

Full Story: The Guardian

 Dr. Peter Jansen has openly released the designs for a series of Science Tricorders that he developed while a graduate student at McMaster University. The Science Tricorders are capable of sensing a variety of atmospheric, electromagnetic, and spatial phenomena. Where the Science Tricorder Mark 1 is a relatively easy-to-build proof of concept, the Science Tricorder Mark 2 runs Linux and resembles a cross between a Nintendo DS and scientific instrument with dual OLED touch displays.


Full Story: Slashdot

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: innovation, tech, technology, open source,.

You can help build an open air quality sensor network

In the world of December 2011 that we live in, data drives activism - you can join up to help Pachube map air quality

Full Story: Pachube

Posted at 11:00am and tagged with: tech, technology, sensors, open source, Environment, internet of things,.

You can help build an open air quality sensor network



In the world of December 2011 that we live in, data drives activism - you can join up to help Pachube map air quality

Full Story: Pachube

smarterplanet:

Pachube opens the Internet of things to end users | Information Age

Sensor data integration platform’s new service allows its customers’ customers to access information collected about them

IN sensor networks of old, the data produced by, for example, heat or humidity sensors would remain in closed networks, accessible only by the organisation that runs the network.

The basic principle of the ‘Internet of things’ is that sensor data should in fact be openly available for integration with other data sets and for independent application developers to use to build new, innovative systems.

Pachube is a UK-based company that provides real-time data infrastructure for the Internet of things. “We make it very easy for devices to publish to the web in a format that’s easy for people to understand,” explains founder Usman Haque. “We also make it very easy for application developers to build things on top of all that data.”

“Essentially, Pachube is bit like Twitter for machines,” he says.

The pitch to sensor manufacturers is as follows: “If you’re a manufacturer, all you have to do is write a little bit of firmware which goes on your device, and we’ll take care of the rest. On the input end, we’ve got a standard interface for handling data in a variety of formats, and at the other end, we can convert that data into formats such as JSON, which is very popular among web developers.”

Posted at 3:28am and tagged with: technology, tech, data, internet of things, Transparency, open source,.

smarterplanet:

Pachube opens the Internet of things to end users | Information Age
 
Sensor data integration platform’s new service allows its customers’ customers to access information collected about them
IN sensor networks of old, the data produced by, for example, heat or humidity sensors would remain in  closed networks, accessible only by the organisation that runs the  network.
The basic principle of the ‘Internet of things’ is that sensor data  should in fact be openly available for integration with other data sets  and for independent application developers to use to build new,  innovative systems.
Pachube is a UK-based company that provides real-time data infrastructure for the Internet of things. “We make it very easy for devices to  publish to the web in a format that’s easy for people to understand,”  explains founder Usman Haque. “We also make it very easy for application  developers to build things on top of all that data.”
“Essentially, Pachube is bit like Twitter for machines,” he says.
The pitch to sensor manufacturers is as follows: “If you’re a  manufacturer, all you have to do is write a little bit of firmware which  goes on your device, and we’ll take care of the rest. On the input end,  we’ve got a standard interface for handling data in a variety of  formats, and at the other end, we can convert that data into formats  such as JSON, which is very popular among web developers.”

smarterplanet:

Digital Gardening: MBG Puts 6.3 Million Plants Online | ReadWriteWeb

Life itself is the biggest of all big data. The amount of information contained within one leaf is staggering, but the information contained within 6.3 million plant specimens staggers. Currently, those samples are contained in two buildings of the Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) in St. Louis. But soon, they will all be online.

Did I say soon? I meant eventually. A team at the Garden, one of the largest repositories of botanical information in the world, is photographing and uploading the samples one leaf, seed, pod and stalk at a time. So far, after reviewing just under 4 million, they have uploaded 160,000 images.

In addition to this morphological data, the Garden also has a DNA data bank, with 11,000 samples. Old collections cannot be tested for their DNA as it would irreparably harm the samples, so the look of the plants is paramount. The Garden, PopSci reports, is “working with the Royal Botanic Gardens in the U.K. to build new imaging equipment to scan the samples in super-high resolution, so botanists can zoom and pan and see detail.” They are also one of the institutions involved in the Encyclopedia of Life, an ambitious product to catalogue every species on earth by 2017.

Posted at 8:36pm and tagged with: Data, Open source, Technology, Plants,.

smarterplanet:

Digital Gardening: MBG Puts 6.3 Million Plants Online | ReadWriteWeb
Life itself is the biggest of all big data. The amount of information  contained within one leaf is staggering, but the information contained  within 6.3 million plant specimens staggers. Currently, those samples  are contained in two buildings of the Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) in St. Louis. But soon, they will all be online.
Did I say soon? I meant eventually. A team at the Garden, one of the  largest repositories of botanical information in the world, is  photographing and uploading the samples one leaf, seed, pod and stalk at  a time. So far, after reviewing just under 4 million, they have  uploaded 160,000 images.
…
In addition to this morphological data, the Garden also has a DNA data  bank, with 11,000 samples. Old collections cannot be tested for their  DNA as it would irreparably harm the samples, so the look of the plants  is paramount. The Garden, PopSci reports, is “working with the Royal  Botanic Gardens in the U.K. to build new imaging equipment to scan the  samples in super-high resolution, so botanists can zoom and pan and see  detail.” They are also one of the institutions involved in the Encyclopedia of Life, an ambitious product to catalogue every species on earth by 2017.

futuramb:

smarterplanet:

IBM open-sources ‘Internet of Things’ protocol | KurzweilAI

IBM announced it is joining with Italy-based hardware architecture firm Eurotech in donating a complete draft protocol for asynchronous inter-device communication to the Eclipse Foundation, ReadWriteWeb reports.

A projected 24 billion simultaneous devices — sending billions of messages per hour — including RFID tags on shipping crates, heart rate monitors, GPS devices, smartphone firmware, automobile maintenance systems, and even earrings may become more socially active than any teenager presently alive by the year 2020.

The new asynchronous inter-device communication protocol is called Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT), the machine-to-machine counterpart of HTTP (used on websites).

I have some doubt about the lines above that says digital and sustainable society. I agree that communication is a key capability for achieving resilience and sustainability, but does a world of billions of interconnected individuals and things necessarily have the properties of sustainability? That is of course not true in all worlds… Could it even be that the emergence of an Internet of Things is not sustainable at all??

Posted at 1:15pm and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, open source,.

futuramb:

smarterplanet:

IBM open-sources ‘Internet of Things’ protocol | KurzweilAI
IBM announced it is joining with Italy-based hardware architecture  firm  Eurotech in donating a complete draft protocol for asynchronous   inter-device communication to the Eclipse Foundation, ReadWriteWeb reports.
A  projected 24 billion simultaneous devices — sending billions of  messages per hour —  including  RFID tags on shipping crates, heart rate  monitors, GPS devices,  smartphone firmware, automobile maintenance  systems, and even earrings may become more socially active than any teenager presently  alive by the year 2020.
The new asynchronous  inter-device communication protocol is called Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT), the machine-to-machine counterpart of HTTP (used on websites).

I have some doubt about the lines above that says digital and sustainable society. I agree that communication is a key capability for achieving resilience and sustainability, but does a world of billions of interconnected individuals and things necessarily have the properties of sustainability? That is of course not true in all worlds… Could it even be that the emergence of an Internet of Things is not sustainable at all??

50 Companies Team to Create Open Source EV


The StreetScooter is a $7,000 EV with a 74 mph top speed and an 80-mile range. It relies on leased batteries and uses a heat pump for heating and air conditioning, and shipping company DHL has already ordered 3,500 of them — but the most interesting thing about the vehicle is how it came to be.

What began as a partnership of 10 companies has grown to a collaboration among more than 50 auto parts suppliers, tech companies and software developers. Each one of them had a hand not only in building the StreetScooter, but in creating it.

Full Story: Wired

Posted at 3:42pm and tagged with: collaboration, innovation, open source,.

50 Companies Team to Create Open Source EV


The StreetScooter is a $7,000 EV with a 74 mph top speed and an 80-mile range. It relies on leased batteries and uses a heat pump for heating and air conditioning, and shipping company DHL has already ordered 3,500 of them — but the most interesting thing about the vehicle is how it came to be.
What began as a partnership of 10 companies has grown to a collaboration among more than 50 auto parts suppliers, tech companies and software developers. Each one of them had a hand not only in building the StreetScooter, but in creating it.
Full Story: Wired

smarterplanet:

Open Source Ecology - Global Village Construction Set

Open Source Ecology is a network of farmers, engineers, and supporters that for the last two years has been creating the Global Village Construction Set, an open source, low-cost, high performance technological platform that allows for the easy, DIY fabrication of the 50 different Industrial Machines that it takes to build a sustainable civilization with modern comforts. The GVCS lowers the barriers to entry into farming, building, and manufacturing and can be seen as a life-size lego-like set of modular tools that can create entire economies, whether in rural Missouri, where the project was founded, in urban redevelopment, or in the developing world.

Posted at 4:09am and tagged with: food, agriculture, open source, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

Open Source Ecology - Global Village Construction Set
Open Source Ecology is a network of farmers, engineers, and supporters that for the last two years has been creating the Global Village Construction Set,  an open source, low-cost, high performance technological platform that  allows for the easy, DIY fabrication of the 50 different Industrial  Machines that it takes to build a sustainable civilization with modern  comforts. The GVCS lowers the barriers to entry into farming, building, and manufacturing and can be seen as a life-size lego-like set of modular tools that can create entire economies, whether in rural Missouri, where the project was founded, in urban redevelopment, or in the developing world.