Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

smarterplanet:

The revolutionary material used to build the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, the Airbus A350 super-jumbo jet, and the military’s stealth jet fighter planes is coming down to Earth in a new generation of energy-saving automobiles expected to hit the roads during the next few years. That ultra-strong carbon fiber composite material — 50% lighter than steel and 30% lighter than aluminum — is the topic of the cover story in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News, ACS’s weekly newsmagazine.

Posted at 12:09pm and tagged with: nanotechnology, products, carbon composite, energy, materials, cars, automobiles, energy,.

smarterplanet:

As revolutionary as the mobile ecosystem is, it’s the interactions of more intelligent connected devices with people outside of the context of phones or computers that will drive more innovation, says Mark Rolston, chief creative officer at Frog Design. Rolston, speaking at the Mobile Future Forward conference Monday in Seattle described a future where devices become more contextually aware thanks to embedded and connected sensors.

Instead of thinking about the buttons on a phone or a laptop, manufacturers and designers need to think about what will happen when computers are embedded in everything and connected all the time. Instead of computing confined in a box on a desk or in the hand, computers will be everywhere pulling data from a variety of places. Understanding how those computers will pull information about their environment, relay that data to users and then interpret what users want them to do creates a web of interaction that will require new ways of thinking and design.

Posted at 4:43pm and tagged with: internet of things, design, products, Mark Rolston, Frog Design,.

smarterplanet:

People are using mobile devices and notebooks to access the mobile Web more than ever before, according to an IDC report.

More U.S. Internet users will access the Internet through mobile devices than through PCs or other wireline devices by 2015, according to a report from IT analytics firm International Data Corporation. The company’s Worldwide New Media Market Model (NMMM) forecast that as smartphones begin to outsell simpler feature phones, and as media tablet sales explode, the number of mobile Internet users would grow by a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 16.6 percent between 2010 and 2015.

The report noted that the impact of smartphone and, especially, media tablet adoption will be so great that the number of users accessing the Internet through PCs will first stagnate and then slowly decline. Western Europe and Japan will not be far behind the United States in following this trend, the report noted.

Worldwide, the total number of Internet user will grow from 2 billion in 2010 to 2.7 billion in 2015, when 40 percent of the world’s population will have access to its resources.

Posted at 7:20am and tagged with: IT infrastructure, mobile, products, internet, IDC, trends,.

smarterplanet:

Way back in the early days of 2011, the world’s smallest electric motor was so…big. At 200 nanometers wide, it was a whopping 1/300th the size of a human hair.

Now, chemists at Tufts University’s School of Arts and Sciences have smashed that record, which was set in 2005, with this weekend’s unveiling of their single-molecule electric motor, which at 1 nanometer wide could be the first in an entirely new class of devices with potential use in medicine and engineering.

Posted at 10:45am and tagged with: nanotechnology, products, innovation,.

smarterplanet:

Sony’s head-mounted 3D visor is real, HMZ-T1 arrives in Japan November 11th - Engadget

Remember that crazy wearable 3D display concept Sony was showing off at CES 2011? Turns out the company is actually going to make it, and the HMZ-T1 is scheduled to be released in Japan on November 11th. While the design has changed slightly since we first laid our eyes, and heads, on it, the specs appear to be the same, with two 1280x720 0.7-inch OLED panels mounted in front of each eye giving the wearer an experience similar to viewing a 750-inch screen from 20m away, as well as 5.1 surround sound from headphones integrated into the Head Mounted Display (HMD). You can see the helmet above, as well as the processor unit (complete with HDMI input and output, so you can take off the helmet and watch on TV) that it must remain tethered to. Pricing is expected to be 60,000 yen ($783 US). Check out the press release and our hands-on video from CES after the break and decide if living out a Geordi La Forge-style fantasy is worth it.

Posted at 1:37pm and tagged with: Sony, 3D, headset, 3D, visor, HMZ-T1, wearable computer, products, OLED, entertainment, innovation,.

smarterplanet:

Sony’s head-mounted 3D visor is real, HMZ-T1 arrives in Japan November 11th - Engadget
Remember that crazy wearable 3D display concept Sony was showing off at CES 2011? Turns out the company is actually going to make it, and the HMZ-T1 is scheduled to be released in Japan on November 11th. While the design has changed slightly since we first laid our eyes, and heads, on it, the specs appear to be the same, with two 1280x720 0.7-inch OLED panels mounted in front of each eye giving the wearer an experience similar to viewing a 750-inch screen from 20m away, as well as 5.1 surround sound from headphones integrated into the Head Mounted Display (HMD). You can see the helmet above, as well as the processor unit (complete with HDMI input and output, so you can take off the helmet and watch on TV) that it must remain tethered to. Pricing is expected to be 60,000 yen ($783 US). Check out the press release and our hands-on video from CES after the break and decide if living out a Geordi La Forge-style fantasy is worth it.

smarterplanet:

 IBM VP : My Three Essentials For Creating Innovative New Products | Co. Design

BM’s Lee Green provides a road map for generating disruptive technologies, objects, and experiences.

No matter the forum or platform, designers, executives, and consumers love to discuss (and use) products and services that seem to break the mold. These ideas are disruptive, creative, and often counterintuitive. A decade ago, who could have predicted that mobile phones would take the place of digital cameras, for both still and video images, in the minds and hands of consumers? Or that serious chefs would consider food-truck businesses, once the domain of low-end services but now a trendy, fast, and cost-effective way to open a “restaurant”?

Onlookers often think that such marketplace and marketing successes are products of one-off “aha” moments of inspiration or unique research methods. But there are actual strategies that designers and businesses can follow to create such disruptive technologies, objects, and experiences. Here are my three tried-and-true tactics:

1. Support what is likely to fail.

By this I don’t mean prioritize experiments and concepts that look like they might not sell; I mean consider technology and designs that might not seem to work for their intended purposes. This is the approach of James Dyson, the British engineer and vacuum entrepreneur, and the company that bears his name. While developing breakthrough products, such as the energy-saving hand-drying machine known as the Airblade, Dyson and his team take note of what ideas and prototypes aren’t achieving their goals and then find new uses for them.

Posted at 6:43am and tagged with: design, innovation, products, disruption,.

smarterplanet:

 IBM VP : My Three Essentials For Creating Innovative New Products | Co. Design
BM’s Lee Green provides a road map for generating disruptive technologies, objects, and experiences.
No matter the forum or platform, designers, executives, and  consumers love to discuss (and use) products and services that seem to  break the mold. These ideas are disruptive, creative, and often  counterintuitive. A decade ago, who could have predicted that mobile  phones would take the place of digital cameras, for both still and video  images, in the minds and hands of consumers? Or that serious chefs  would consider food-truck businesses, once the domain of low-end  services but now a trendy, fast, and cost-effective way to open a  “restaurant”?
Onlookers often think that such marketplace and marketing successes  are products of one-off “aha” moments of inspiration or unique research  methods. But there are actual strategies that designers and businesses  can follow to create such disruptive technologies, objects, and  experiences. Here are my three tried-and-true tactics:
1. Support what is likely to fail.
By this I don’t mean prioritize experiments and concepts that look  like they might not sell; I mean consider technology and designs that  might not seem to work for their intended purposes. This is the approach  of James Dyson, the British engineer and vacuum entrepreneur, and the  company that bears his name. While developing breakthrough products,  such as the energy-saving hand-drying machine known as the Airblade,  Dyson and his team take note of what ideas and prototypes aren’t  achieving their goals and then find new uses for them.

smarterplanet:

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb

Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.

The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: Amazon, HTML5, Kindle, apps, commerce, products, competition, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb
Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS  apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the  margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.
The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s  accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around  Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of  an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality  of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for  Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.