Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

On Friday I re-blogged Alex Madrigal’s article from the Atlantic showing a chart of the percentage of Americans reading books over time:

http://emergentfutures.tumblr.com/post/21017030486/the-next-time-someone-says-the-internet-killed

The original article (which is linked to in the re-blog) shows the chart that I have attached to this post

This had received 1057 notes in less than 48 hours which got me thinking so I have written a longer piece on what it means it over at www.futuristpaul.com

Posted at 9:33am and tagged with: reading, tech, technology,.

On Friday I re-blogged Alex Madrigal’s article from the Atlantic showing a chart of the percentage of Americans reading books over time:
http://emergentfutures.tumblr.com/post/21017030486/the-next-time-someone-says-the-internet-killed
The original article (which is linked to in the re-blog) shows the chart that I have attached to this post
This had received 1057 notes in less than 48 hours which got me thinking so I have written a longer piece on what it means it over at www.futuristpaul.com

The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Killed Reading Books, Show Them This Chart

"Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. 

Well, that time never existed. Check out these stats from Gallup surveys. In 1957, not even a quarter of Americans were reading a book or novel. By 2005, that number had shot up to 47 percent. I couldn’t find a more recent number, but I think it’s fair to say that reading probably hasn’t declined to the horrific levels of the 1950s.”


Full Story: Atlantic

Posted at 7:20pm and tagged with: reading, tech, technology, internet, attention,.

The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Killed Reading Books, Show Them This Chart


"Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. Well, that time never existed. Check out these stats from Gallup surveys. In 1957, not even a quarter of Americans were reading a book or novel. By 2005, that number had shot up to 47 percent. I couldn’t find a more recent number, but I think it’s fair to say that reading probably hasn’t declined to the horrific levels of the 1950s.”

Full Story: Atlantic

gtmcknight:

Every week I use the free Klip.me Chrome extension to send articles to my Kindle with one click. On the weekends when I turn my Kindle on, it’s like an ad-free, magical magazine where every article is interesting to me.

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: reading, technology, tech, tablets,.

gtmcknight:

Every week I use the free Klip.me Chrome extension to send articles to my Kindle with one click. On the weekends when I turn my Kindle on, it’s like an ad-free, magical magazine where every article is interesting to me.

smarterplanet:

Amazon Kindle can now check out e-books from 11,000 libraries - CSMonitor.com

Kindle users can now check out e-books from 11,000 community libraries across the country, Amazon announced today. The process is a simple one: Navigate to the website of your local library, enter your library card number, select a title, click “Send to Kindle,” and plug in your Amazon.com information. Your book can then be transmitted wirelessly or via USB – any gadget with Amazon software will do, including an iPhone or Android handset.

The availability of the e-books will vary from library to library, but most titles should be available on your Kindle for about two weeks. After that, they’ll disappear. In a press release, Amazon exec Jay Marine called libraries a “critical part of our communities,” and framed the initiative as the natural next step for library lending.

“We’re even doing a little extra here – normally, making margin notes in library books is a big no-no,” Marine said. “But we’re fixing this by extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your notes, highlights and bookmarks are always backed up and available the next time you check out the book or if you decide to buy the book.”

Posted at 6:55am and tagged with: Kindle, books, eReader, ebooks, education, lending, libraries, reading, internet of things,.

smarterplanet:

Amazon Kindle can now check out e-books from 11,000 libraries - CSMonitor.com
Kindle users can now check out e-books from 11,000 community libraries across the country, Amazon announced today. The process is a simple one: Navigate to the website  of your local library, enter your library card number, select a title,  click “Send to Kindle,”  and plug in your Amazon.com information. Your book can then be  transmitted wirelessly or via USB – any gadget with Amazon software will  do, including an iPhone or Android handset.
The availability of the e-books will vary from library to library, but  most titles should be available on your Kindle for about two weeks.  After that, they’ll disappear. In a press release, Amazon exec Jay Marine called libraries a “critical part of our communities,” and framed the initiative as the natural next step for library lending.
“We’re even doing a little extra here – normally, making margin notes in  library books is a big no-no,” Marine said. “But we’re fixing this by  extending our Whispersync technology to library books, so your notes, highlights and bookmarks  are always backed up and available the next time you check out the book  or if you decide to buy the book.”

Posted at 6:36pm and tagged with: books, reading, risk, USA,.

To be sure, some people are never going to be readers. We used to feel sorry for them. Now it’s the norm. With the extreme right, it’s a point of pride. Don’t need no book-learnin’ when Rush and Sean and Bill will tell you the truth. There’s Bible-verse flash cards for knowin’ God’s plan, which is to vote Rick Perry. And the “well read” get their “news” from Web sites and tracts that toe a line of partisan half-truths and superstitions. Here we need a Truman Capote to provide the equivalent putdown of “that’s not writing, that’s typing.” No wonder William F. Buckley, who spent his life trying to create an intellectual American conservatism to counter the marginal no-nothingism of reaction died disillusioned. How a nation with a majority of simpletons faces the most complex dangers in history will be tragedy and farce. I just wish we didn’t have to live through it, too.
From: Miles my stepson who has just stepped up his reading enthusiasm

Posted at 10:31am and tagged with: ebooks, reading,.

Can I get a Kindle Reader. These book things are really annoying

Is Mobile Affecting When We Read?

Printed media used to allow us to read in the places we found most comfortable.  When you imagine yourself reading the newspaper it’s probably in your favorite chair, at the breakfast table, or at the cafe with an orange mocha frappuccino in your hand.

via @rossdawson

Posted at 4:09am and tagged with: mobile, reading,.

Is Mobile Affecting When We Read?

Printed media used to allow us to read in the places we found most   comfortable.  When you imagine yourself reading the newspaper it’s  probably in your  favorite chair, at the breakfast table, or at the cafe  with an orange  mocha frappuccino in your hand.

via @rossdawson

smarterplanet:

Amazon: Kindle Books Now Outselling Hardcovers | Mashable

E-books have hit a definitive tipping point. In each of the last three months, Amazon reports that sales of books for Kindle have outpaced the sale of hardcover books, and that growth is only accelerating. In a statement, Amazon says that, “over the past three months, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 143 Kindle books. Over the past month, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 180 Kindle books.”  

Posted at 7:51am and tagged with: ebooks, reading,.

smarterplanet:

Amazon: Kindle Books Now Outselling Hardcovers | Mashable
E-books have hit a definitive tipping point. In each of the last three months, Amazon reports that sales of books for Kindle have outpaced the sale of hardcover books, and that growth is only accelerating. In a statement, Amazon says that, “over the past three months, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 143 Kindle books. Over the past month, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 180 Kindle books.”  

Reading on Paper is Faster than iBooks on the iPad

It will take you longer to read a book on an iPad or Kindle compared to the printed page, according to a recent study. Dr. Jakob Nielsen of the Nielsen Norman Group—a product development consultancy that is not associated with Nielsen, the metrics company—compared the reading times of 24 users on the Kindle 2, an iPad using the iBooks application, a PC monitor and good old fashioned paper. The study found that reading on an electronic tablet was up to 10.7 percent slower than reading a printed book. Despite the slower reading times, Nielsen found that users preferred reading books on a tablet device compared to the paper book. The PC monitor, meanwhile, was universally hated as a reading platform among all test subjects.

Posted at 7:00pm and tagged with: reading, devices,.

Reading on Paper is Faster than iBooks on the iPad

It will take you longer to read a book on an iPad or Kindle compared to  the printed page, according to a recent study.  Dr. Jakob Nielsen of the  Nielsen Norman Group—a product development consultancy that is not  associated with Nielsen, the metrics company—compared the reading times  of 24 users on the Kindle 2, an iPad using the iBooks application, a PC monitor and good old  fashioned paper.  The study found that reading on an electronic tablet  was up to 10.7 percent slower than reading a printed book.  Despite the  slower reading times, Nielsen found that users preferred reading books  on a tablet device compared to the paper book. The PC monitor,  meanwhile, was universally hated as a reading platform among all test  subjects.

Yes, People Still Read, but Now It’s Social

THE point of books is to combat loneliness,” David Foster Wallace observes near the beginning of “Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself,” David Lipsky’s recently published, book-length interview with him.

Posted at 1:04am and tagged with: ebooks, reading, social networking,.

Yes, People Still Read, but Now It’s Social

THE point of books is to combat loneliness,” David  Foster Wallace observes near the beginning of “Although  of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself,” David Lipsky’s recently  published, book-length interview with him.