Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

Paul Higgins: My first thought was “shark”

smarterplanet:

Spanish Government Deploys Robotic Fish to Monitor Maritime Pollution

Currently the port relies on divers to monitor water quality, which is a lengthy process costing €100,000 per year. The divers take water samples from hundreds of points in the port, then send them off for analysis, with the results taking weeks to return. By contrast, the SHOAL robots would continuously monitor the water, letting the port respond immediately to the causes of pollution, such as a leaking boat or industrial spillage, and work to mitigate its effects.

The SHOAL fish are one and a half metres long, comparable to the size and shape of a tuna, but their neon-yellow plastic shell means they are unlikely to be mistaken for the real thing. A range of onboard chemical sensors detect lead, copper and other pollutants, along with measuring water salinity.

They are driven by a dual-hinged tail capable of making tight turns that would be impossible with a propeller-driven robot. They are also less noisy, reducing the impact on marine life.

The robots are battery powered and capable of running for 8 hours between charges. At the moment the researchers have to recover them by boat, but their plan is that the fish will return to a charging station by themselves.

Working in a group, the fish can cover a 1 kilometre-square region of water, down to a depth of 30 metres. They communicate with each other and a nearby base-station using very low-frequency sound waves, which can penetrate the water more easily than radio waves. However, this means the fish have a low data transmission rate and can only send short, predefined messages. “It’s a good solution, but it requires thinking carefully about what data to transmit and how to use that data,” says Kristi Morgansen, a roboticist at the University of Washington, who was not involved in the research.

Robotic fish shoal sniffs out pollution in harbours - environment - 22 May 2012 - New Scientist

via joshbyard:

Posted at 5:23pm and tagged with: tech, technology, robots, internet of things, environment, sensors,.

Paul Higgins: My first thought was “shark”

smarterplanet:

Spanish Government Deploys Robotic Fish to Monitor Maritime Pollution
Currently the port relies on divers to monitor water quality, which is a lengthy process costing €100,000 per year. The divers take water samples from hundreds of points in the port, then send them off for analysis, with the results taking weeks to return. By contrast, the SHOAL robots would continuously monitor the water, letting the port respond immediately to the causes of pollution, such as a leaking boat or industrial spillage, and work to mitigate its effects.
The SHOAL fish are one and a half metres long, comparable to the size and shape of a tuna, but their neon-yellow plastic shell means they are unlikely to be mistaken for the real thing. A range of onboard chemical sensors detect lead, copper and other pollutants, along with measuring water salinity.
They are driven by a dual-hinged tail capable of making tight turns that would be impossible with a propeller-driven robot. They are also less noisy, reducing the impact on marine life.
The robots are battery powered and capable of running for 8 hours between charges. At the moment the researchers have to recover them by boat, but their plan is that the fish will return to a charging station by themselves.
Working in a group, the fish can cover a 1 kilometre-square region of water, down to a depth of 30 metres. They communicate with each other and a nearby base-station using very low-frequency sound waves, which can penetrate the water more easily than radio waves. However, this means the fish have a low data transmission rate and can only send short, predefined messages. “It’s a good solution, but it requires thinking carefully about what data to transmit and how to use that data,” says Kristi Morgansen, a roboticist at the University of Washington, who was not involved in the research.
Robotic fish shoal sniffs out pollution in harbours - environment - 22 May 2012 - New Scientist
via joshbyard:

futurescope:

Contact lenses ‘see’ blood sugar levels for diabetics

Millions of Americans who have diabetes may be able to get rid of their painful blood testing devices in favor of a prototype being developed at the University of Akron. These lenses sense the glucose in your tears that, if not being metabolized correctly, would build up just as it would in your blood. The contact lens would recognize the problem and change color to alert the wearer. […]

[read more @dvice] [University of Akron]

Posted at 10:11am and tagged with: health, technology, sensors, tech,.

Mya Frazier, technologyreview.com

Mal­i­ca Astin, 11, never paid much atten­tion to how much phys­i­cal activ­i­ty she got. But one day she played bas­ket­ball while wear­ing a small activ­i­ty track­er called a Zamzee on her waist. Later, she plugged it into a com­put­er’s USB po…

Posted at 10:11am and tagged with: tech, technology, health, sensors,.

smarterplanet:

The exponentially growing number of objects connected to the Internet is changing our world. What new business models will appear? Which processes can be optimized? How many vertical markets are benefited? Libelium, a wireless sensor networks platform provider, has made a list showing how the “Internet of Things” is becoming the next technological revolution. 

The list includes the most trendy scenarios, like Smart Cities where sensors can offer us services like Smart Parking to find free parking spots in the streets or managing the intensity of the luminosity in street lights to save energy. Climate change, environmental protection, water quality or CO2 emissions also are addressed by sensor networks.

“Since 2008, there are more objects connected to the Internet than persons in the world and this figure will hit 50 billion by 2020!. Now we can interact not only with contents in Websites but with real objects,” the company says. “For the first time, we can live in Smart Cities full of sensors that help us to improve our lifestyle and machines that talk to other machines on their own. As a result, people and objects jump into the Internet adding new layers of data and complexity. The ‘virtual’ Internet we knew is becoming more ‘physical’ than ever. We have entered into the ‘Internet of Things’ era.”

Posted at 8:21am and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, sensors, business models,.

smarterplanet:

By merging data from cars’ onboard computers and drivers’ smart phones, AT&T researchers have created a system that reports on drivers’ real-time behavior and long-term driving trends—and reveals whether a particular mistake might have been caused by phone use.

via singularitarian:

Posted at 9:12pm and tagged with: transport, sensors, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

Striiv, a smart pedometer that uses game mechanics to motivate people, is getting updated Wednesday with a new personal wireless connection that lets users encourage and compete with each other. With the new Striiv Connected social component, Striiv is moving beyond a more solo experience and utilizing relationships to help further drive users.

With the updated Striiv, users will be able to connect over a personal wireless network that works over unlicensed spectrum for a short distance. When connected, users can exchange their personal best and averages and issue activity challenges with Striiv Energy or real prizes like chores or coffee awarded to the winner. The activities can be conducted together or separately with the winner determined when the two devices are synced. Users will also get bonus points or a trophy for that day when they beat a friends average or personal best. Striiv Connected will work with existing Striiv devices though at a shorter range.

Posted at 2:49am and tagged with: technology, internet of things, location, tech, sensors, health,.

smarterplanet:

Tsubuyaku Sensor is a new wireless device from Japanese Ubiquitous Computing Technology that monitors conditions such as temperature, humidity and radiation levels and automatically tweets the resulting data via Twitter.

If Twitter can be used to broadcast recipesschool lunch menus and fresh bread alerts — to name just a few of the many examples we’ve covered — then why not environmental data as well? That, indeed, is just what’s possible with the Tsubuyaku Sensor, a new wireless device from Japanese Ubiquitous Computing Technology that monitors conditions such as temperature, humidity and radiation levels and automatically tweets the resulting data via Twitter.

Targeted primarily at applications including food warehouses and wine cellars, the Tsubuyaku Sensor measures data including temperature, humidity or radiation levels and can then automatically broadcast it to Twitter, according to a recent TechCrunch report. Boasting a battery life of about a year when posts are made every minute, the device features a range of about 40 meters, though a repeater option is available to extend that further. Twitter broadcasts can be set for public or private viewing. Pricing is USD 560 for the base unit and USD 286 for each sensor.

Is there any end to the remote monitoring possibilities? We’re thinking not. One for inspiration!

More info here and here.

Posted at 1:50pm and tagged with: data, sensors, tech, technology, internet of things,.

smarterplanet:

Cadillac testing ‘Super Cruise’ feature for future cars | Physorg.com

Cadillac is reportedly joining the crowd working on features that it says should reduce car accidents by allowing the car to drive itself under optimal conditions, relieving the driver from fatigue, making road trips safer for the driver and passengers. Currently, Cadillac is already offering features that intercede on the driver’s behalf should the vehicle “sense” a dangerous situation. The new technology, which GM says likely will make it into showrooms by the middle of the decade, should make cars even safer by removing the hazard caused by human fatigue.

Posted at 4:42am and tagged with: transport, technology, tech, sensors,.

smarterplanet:

Cadillac testing ‘Super Cruise’ feature for future cars | Physorg.com
Cadillac is reportedly joining the crowd working on features that it says should reduce car accidents by allowing the car to drive itself under optimal conditions, relieving the driver from fatigue, making road trips safer for the driver and passengers. Currently, Cadillac is already offering features that intercede on the driver’s behalf should the vehicle “sense” a dangerous situation. The new technology, which GM says likely will make it into showrooms by the middle of the decade, should make cars even safer by removing the hazard caused by human fatigue.

smarterplanet:

Your next mayor: a computer | KurzweilAI

In May 2009, some residents of Paris were given La Montre Verte (“The Green Watch”). The watch is actually a watch, and it also has two sensors to detect noise levels and ozone levels, a GPS chip, and a Bluetooth chip. As people went about their day, the watch recorded the noise and ozone in their environment. The data was transferred to a companion mobile phone application, regularly uploaded to a central server, and crunched into maps like this. (Credit: Fing)

“Almost anything — any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small — can become digitally aware and networked,” said IBM Chairman Samuel J. Palmisano at the 2010 SmarterCities forum in Shanghai. “Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and instrumented things — cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines …”

Posted at 9:10pm and tagged with: tech, technology, internet of things, sensors, networks, data,.

smarterplanet:

Your next mayor: a computer | KurzweilAI
In May 2009, some residents of Paris were given La Montre Verte (“The Green Watch”). The watch is actually a watch, and it also has two sensors to detect noise levels and ozone levels, a GPS chip, and a Bluetooth chip. As people went about their day, the watch recorded the noise and ozone in their environment. The data was transferred to a companion mobile phone application, regularly uploaded to a central server, and crunched into maps like this. (Credit: Fing)
“Almost anything — any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small — can become digitally aware and networked,” said IBM Chairman Samuel J. Palmisano at the 2010 SmarterCities forum in Shanghai. “Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and instrumented things — cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines …”