Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.
A 19-year-old Egyptian university student called Aisha Mustafa has invented a propulsion device intended to offer spacecrafts a new method and cheaper means of energy consumption. The propulsion device promises chances of using quantum physics and chemical reactions in artificial satellites, instead of the current radioactive-based jets and ordinary rocket engines. Mustafa’s device is based on a scientific mix between quantum physics, space technology, chemical reactions and electrical sciences. Mustafa said the inventions generates energy for space vehicles from electric energy formed by Casimir-polder force, which occurs between separate surfaces and objects in a vacuum and by the zero-point energy considered as the lowest state of energy.

'Beams' from space that could power cities: First tests on solar satellites offer hope of green energy 



Researchers at Stratchclyde University have already tested equipment in space, a first step for solar panels to collect energy and transfer it back to earth through microwaves or lasers.

The researchers aim to produce a ‘swarm’ of satellites that could one day power whole cities.



Full Story: Mailonline

Posted at 7:22pm and tagged with: energy, space,.

'Beams' from space that could power cities: First tests on solar satellites offer hope of green energy 


Researchers at Stratchclyde University have already tested equipment in space, a first step for solar panels to collect energy and transfer it back to earth through microwaves or lasers.
The researchers aim to produce a ‘swarm’ of satellites that could one day power whole cities.
Full Story: Mailonline

Mission hopes to find fish on Jupiter’s moons


The European Space Agency has approved a mission to Jupiter’s moons to discover whether fish live under their icy surfaces.

The mission will send a five-tonne satellite to the solar system’s biggest planet to study three of its largest moons - Callisto, Europa and Ganymede.

These are of special interest because beneath their icy surface it is thought they might have vast oceans.

Scientists believe this makes them one of the most likely places in the solar system to harbour alien life, possibly even fish.

Full Story: ABC

Posted at 7:49am and tagged with: space, science,.

Mission hopes to find fish on Jupiter’s moons


The European Space Agency has approved a mission to Jupiter’s moons to discover whether fish live under their icy surfaces.
The mission will send a five-tonne satellite to the solar system’s biggest planet to study three of its largest moons - Callisto, Europa and Ganymede.
These are of special interest because beneath their icy surface it is thought they might have vast oceans.
Scientists believe this makes them one of the most likely places in the solar system to harbour alien life, possibly even fish.

Full Story: ABC

futurescope:

3D-Printing in Space

Nextbigfuture published a couple of posts about the use of 3D-printing for future space missions and applications:

  • A printable spacecraft project, by Kendra Short and Dr. David Van Buren, is running as part of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts: “Flexible printed electronics have revolutionized consumer products such as cellular phones and PDAs, allowing greater functionality with decreasing size and weight. We think the same can be done for spacecraft. We propose to investigate the feasibility of implementing a complete end to end spacecraft - science measurement through data downlink – based purely on flexible substrate “printed” electronics. The benefits would be decreased design/fabrication cycle time, reduced unit level mass and volume, and decreased unit level cost.” - [presentation (pdf)]
  • Also part of the 2012 NIAC Spring Symposium: Contour Crafting Simulation Plan for Lunar Settlement Infrastructure Build up, by Behrokh Koshnevis. ”Contour Crafting is a system for printing with cement like a very large ink jet printer. It has made 1 story structures here on earth.” - [presentation (pdf, 121mb)]
  • Additive Manufacturing for the Space Industry, by Made in Space, Inc. “Made in Space, Inc. is a space manufacturing company that leverages the rapid advancements in 3D printing and additive manufacturing to offer unique solutions for the aerospace industry. Additive manufacturing is the process of building (or “3D printing”) a product layer by layer. A wide range of materials can be printed with additive manufacturing machines, from hard plastics to Aluminum and Titanium. Example spacecraft components that can be built include more efficient rocket nozzles and lighter miniaturized satellite parts.” - [Made in Space, Inc.]

[via] [2012 NIAC Spring Symposium]

Posted at 10:07am and tagged with: 3D Printing, space, tech, technology,.

wired:

Future extraterrestrial rovers may be powered remotely by high-energy laser beams shot through miles of thin fiber-optic cables. This new technology could allow robotic probes to penetrate thick layers of ice to explore Antarctic lakes or the subterranean oceans on icy moons like Europa or Enceladus, and even power a new kind of rocket into space.

“Our modest goal over the next three years is to use a 5,000-watt laser to send a cryobot through up to 250 meters of ice,” inventor and explorer Bill Stone, who presented the new concept today at NASA’s Astrobiology Science Conference in Atlanta, told Wired. “All the data show there are no show-stoppers for doing that. But from my standpoint, this is child’s play compared to what we could do.”

LASERS drilling into SPACE?!

YES, THAT IS CHILD’S PLAY INDEED.

Posted at 9:32am and tagged with: space, tech, technology, robots,.

wired:


Future extraterrestrial rovers may be powered remotely by high-energy laser beams shot through miles of thin fiber-optic cables. This new technology could allow robotic probes to penetrate thick layers of ice to explore Antarctic lakes or the subterranean oceans on icy moons like Europa or Enceladus, and even power a new kind of rocket into space.
“Our modest goal over the next three years is to use a 5,000-watt laser to send a cryobot through up to 250 meters of ice,” inventor and explorer Bill Stone, who presented the new concept today at NASA’s Astrobiology Science Conference in Atlanta, told Wired. “All the data show there are no show-stoppers for doing that. But from my standpoint, this is child’s play compared to what we could do.”

LASERS drilling into SPACE?!
YES, THAT IS CHILD’S PLAY INDEED.

The Amazing Trajectories of Life-Bearing Meteorites from Earth

The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs must have ejected billions of tons of life-bearing rock into space. Now physicists have calculated what must have happened to it.

Full Story: Technology Review

Posted at 5:31pm and tagged with: science, space,.

The Amazing Trajectories of Life-Bearing Meteorites from Earth


The asteroid that killed the dinosaurs must have ejected billions of tons of life-bearing rock into space. Now physicists have calculated what must have happened to it.

Full Story: Technology Review

Paul Higgins: There goes my dream of living to a thousand years old and travelling the galaxy



Study finds eye problems common for astronauts

Brain and eye problems have surfaced in astronauts who spent more than a month in space, marking a potential setback to plans for longer deep space missions, a US study said on Tuesday.


Full Story: ABC

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: space, health,.

Paul Higgins: There goes my dream of living to a thousand years old and travelling the galaxy


Study finds eye problems common for astronauts
Brain and eye problems have surfaced in astronauts who spent more than a month in space, marking a potential setback to plans for longer deep space missions, a US study said on Tuesday.

Full Story: ABC

mothernaturenetwork:

What private spaceflight looks like by 2019: More than 1,000 launches a year
FAA administrator proposes some ideas that could help make the annual doubling of commercial launches a reality.

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: Trends, Space, Tech, Technology,.

mothernaturenetwork:

What private spaceflight looks like by 2019: More than 1,000 launches a yearFAA administrator proposes some ideas that could help make the annual doubling of commercial launches a reality.

unexpectedtech:

It may be possible to travel to space in an elevator as early as 2050, a major construction company has announced.

Obayashi Corp., headquartered in Tokyo, on Monday unveiled a project to build a gigantic elevator that would transport passengers to a station 36,000 kilometers above the Earth.

For the envisaged project, the company would utilize carbon nanotubes, which are 20 times stronger than steel, to produce cables for the space elevator.

The idea of space elevators has been described in several science-fiction novels. Obayashi, however, believes it is possible to construct one in the real world thanks to carbon nanotubes, which were invented in the 1990s, the company said.

Some other organizations have also been studying the development of space elevators, such as the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

In Obayashi’s project, a cable would be stretched up to 96,000 kilometers, or about one-fourth of the distance between the Earth and the moon. One end of the cable would be anchored at a spaceport on the ground, while the other would be fitted with a counterweight.

The terminal station would house laboratories and living space. The car could carry up to 30 people to the station at 200 kilometers per hour, which would mean a 7-1/2 day trip to reach the station. Magnetic linear motors are one possible means of propulsion for the car, according to Obayashi.

Solar power generation facilities would also be set up around the terminal station to transmit power to the ground, the company added.

Whether carbon nanotubes can be mass-produced economically enough and whether various organizations from around the world can work together are two key issues facing the development of the space elevator, according to the company.

“At this moment, we cannot estimate the cost for the project,” an Obayashi official said. “However, we’ll try to make steady progress so that it won’t end just up as simply a dream.”

Posted at 8:23am and tagged with: technology, tech, space,.

Scientists identify steamy ‘waterworld’ planet

An astronaut attempting to visit recently discovered planet GJ1214b would land in hot water - literally, United States scientists say.

Researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics said they have identified a new kind of planet, dominated not by rock, gas or other common materials - but water.

The planet is “a waterworld enshrouded by a thick, steamy atmosphere”, they said in a statement after scrutinising the planet with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

"GJ1214b is like no planet we know of," astronomer Zachary Berta said.

"A huge fraction of its mass is made up of water.

Full Story: ABC

Posted at 5:51pm and tagged with: science, space,.

Scientists identify steamy ‘waterworld’ planet


An astronaut attempting to visit recently discovered planet GJ1214b would land in hot water - literally, United States scientists say.
Researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics said they have identified a new kind of planet, dominated not by rock, gas or other common materials - but water.
The planet is “a waterworld enshrouded by a thick, steamy atmosphere”, they said in a statement after scrutinising the planet with NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.
"GJ1214b is like no planet we know of," astronomer Zachary Berta said.
"A huge fraction of its mass is made up of water.
Full Story: ABC