Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

parislemon:

Speaking of Google TV at CES, Janko Roettgers of NewTeeVee noticed a potential problem other than being underwhelmed:

But as Google is paving the way to take the platform mainstream, a new, potentially powerful competitor is starting to emerge. No, it’s not Apple’s long-rumored TV set but Google’s own open-source Android operating system, which is used by CE manufacturers and pay-TV operators alike to introduce new devices and services that come with Android apps but without Google’s blessing.

Lenovo introduced the first TV using Ice Cream Sandwich, but it’s a completely custom build — meaning no Google apps and no Android Market. Yes, the Kindle Fire model.

Maybe Eric Schmidt isn’t so crazy after all. Maybe Android will be running on “the majority” of televisions soon — but maybe these builds won’t look like Android at all and will have nothing to do with Google. 

Actually, the six month claim is still crazy.

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: Tech, Technology, Television, Operating system, Disruption,.

newyorker:

Will Robert Kyncl and YouTube Revolutionize Television?

On the evening of April 23, 2005, Karim uploaded the first video [above] to YouTube—an eighteen-second clip of him, standing in front of the elephant enclosure at the San Diego Zoo, wearing an ill-fitting hiking jacket. He says, “The cool thing about these guys is that they have really, really, really long trunks, and that’s cool,” smirks a little, and ends with “And that’s pretty much all there is to say.” Civilization would never be the same.

- In this week’s issue: YouTube wants to change the face of television. John Seabrook talks to the two men mapping out the future of TV: http://nyr.kr/yDrODs

Posted at 8:25am and tagged with: Disruption, Tech, Technology, Television, Attention,.

For first time in 20 years, TV ownership declines

The decline was not trivial, either — from 115.9 million TV households in 2011, Nielsen estimates that only 114.7 million homes in the U.S. will have a TV set in 2012. That’s a decline of almost 1 percent at a time when the total number of U.S. households continues to grow.

Full Story: Kansas City Star

Posted at 3:35am and tagged with: attention, trends, television,.

For first time in 20 years, TV ownership declines

The decline was not trivial, either — from 115.9 million TV households in 2011, Nielsen estimates that only 114.7 million homes in the U.S. will have a TV set in 2012. That’s a decline of almost 1 percent at a time when the total number of U.S. households continues to grow.
Full Story: Kansas City Star

bijan:

Last night I was talking to my mom. She recently got an ipad and discovered the Netflix app. Because she now streams netflix to her TV with Boxee and to her ipad, she decided to drop HBO from her cable tv package.

Then this morning, i read an interesting article in todays NYT about the number…

Posted at 6:48am and tagged with: tech, technology, attention, television,.

American Internet Use Catches Up With TV Use - NYTimes.com

we knew this day was coming. thank god. 

(via bijan)

Posted at 6:31pm and tagged with: internet, television,.

While people younger than 30 years old have spent more time with the Internet than television for several years, Forrester’s survey shows that this is the first year that people in older age groups are also doing so.

Just 42% of Americans say they consider the television set to be a necessity, according to a new nationwide survey from the Pew Research Center’s Social & Demographic Trends project. Last year, this figure was 52%. In 2006, it was 64%.

Posted at 6:16am and tagged with: change, telephone, television,.