Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

smarterplanet:

Subretinal implant uses light instead of batteries, shows promise in initial testing — Engadget

There’s been significant progress in bringing sight to the blind in recent years, and this looks set to continue that miraculous trend. Scientists at Stanford University have invented a subretinal photodiode implant for people who have lost their vision due to degenerative retinal diseases. Existing tech involves batteries and wires, but the new implant works without such crude appendages. Instead, it’s activated by near-infrared beams projected by a camera that’s mounted on glasses worn by the patient and can record what the patient sees. The beams then stimulate the optic nerve to allow light perception, motion detection and even basic shape awareness. It hasn’t actually been tested with humans just yet, but the first few rodents volunteers have yet to lodge a single complaint.

Posted at 10:10am and tagged with: tech, technology, augmentation, user interface, health,.

smarterplanet:

Subretinal implant uses light instead of batteries, shows promise in initial testing — Engadget
There’s been significant progress in bringing sight to the blind in recent years, and this looks set to continue that miraculous trend. Scientists at Stanford University have invented a subretinal photodiode implant for people who have lost their vision due to degenerative retinal diseases. Existing tech involves batteries and wires, but the new implant works without such crude appendages. Instead, it’s activated by near-infrared beams projected by a camera that’s mounted on glasses worn by the patient and can record what the patient sees. The beams then stimulate the optic nerve to allow light perception, motion detection and even basic shape awareness. It hasn’t actually been tested with humans just yet, but the first few rodents volunteers have yet to lodge a single complaint.

BBC News
Nature Photonics

futurescope:

The Leap - new gesture control system

The Leap gesture control interface can detect movements as small as one one hundredth of a millimeter, so instead of jumping up and down while flapping your arms, you can control things with the tiniest finger motions.

Best of all, Leap isn’t part of a closed loop system like the Kinect or WiiMote, so it can control any regular on-screen activity much like you do with a mouse. All you do is connect the Leap sensor to your computer via USB, and it will detects motion within a four cubic foot space. Leap Motion is currently seeking developers who can create apps specifically for the interface, but even without special apps this looks like a very cool new way to control your computer. […]

Posted at 9:12pm and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface,.

futuramb:

Kinect imaging lets surgeons keep their focus - tech - 17 May 2012 - New Scientist

On Tuesday last week, a surgeon at Guy’s and St Thomas’ hospital in London began trials of a new device that uses an Xbox Kinect camera to sense body position. Just by waving his arms the surgeon can consult and sift through medical images, such as CT scans or real-time X-rays, while in the middle of an operation.

Maintaining a sterile environment in the operating room is paramount, but scrubbing in and out to scroll through scan images mid-operation can be time-consuming and break a surgeon’s concentration or sense of flow. Depending on the type of surgery, a surgeon will stop and consult medical images anywhere from once an hour to every few minutes. To avoid leaving the table, many surgeons rely on assistants to manipulate the computer for them, a distracting and sometimes frustrating process.

Posted at 1:51pm and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface, health,.

futuramb:

Kinect imaging lets surgeons keep their focus - tech - 17 May 2012 - New Scientist

On Tuesday last week, a surgeon at Guy’s and St Thomas’ hospital in London began trials of a new device that uses an Xbox Kinect camera to sense body position. Just by waving his arms the surgeon can consult and sift through medical images, such as CT scans or real-time X-rays, while in the middle of an operation.
Maintaining a sterile environment in the operating room is paramount, but scrubbing in and out to scroll through scan images mid-operation can be time-consuming and break a surgeon’s concentration or sense of flow. Depending on the type of surgery, a surgeon will stop and consult medical images anywhere from once an hour to every few minutes. To avoid leaving the table, many surgeons rely on assistants to manipulate the computer for them, a distracting and sometimes frustrating process.

Posted at 9:11pm and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface,.

fastcompany:

This Gizmo Lets You Draw A UI On Paper, Then Turns It Into A Touch Screen

Watch the video->

Posted at 12:01pm and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface,.

fastcompany:

This Gizmo Lets You Draw A UI On Paper, Then Turns It Into A Touch Screen
Watch the video->
Ericsson has introduced a new technology that turns the human body into a bridge between gadgets, allowing people to transfer data like they would using a USB cord or a Bluetooth connection by simply touching a device. ‘Connected Me’ would enable everyone to easily transmit information, images and codes, providing the ultimate in convenient and secure connectivity. It uses a technique called “capacitive coupling,” where the natural electrical properties of the human body are used to transmit signals with digital information. So, in the future you could be using your smartphone to pass data through your body to devices such as as electronic locks, printers, speakers and screens.
Make no mistake, there is a trend happening: HTML5 websites are usurping apps in some areas. Media apps will be one of the first categories to be killed off, but over time we’ll see more apps migrate to HTML5. Particularly as some very large companies on the Web, notably Facebook and Google, are heading in this direction already.

How Microsoft’s Kinect Could Replace Your Tailor (No Pins Required)

Raj Sareen’s startup, Styku, was selected as a member of Microsoft’s Kinect Accelerator. He wants your game console to help make your clothes fit better—even if “no two boobs are alike.”
Full Story:FastCompany

Posted at 4:41am and tagged with: tech, technology, user interface, disruption,.

How Microsoft’s Kinect Could Replace Your Tailor (No Pins Required)




Raj Sareen’s startup, Styku, was selected as a member of Microsoft’s Kinect Accelerator. He wants your game console to help make your clothes fit better—even if “no two boobs are alike.”


Full Story:FastCompany