Emergent Futures Tumblelog

This is the Tumblelog of Paul Higgins and Sandy Teagle - Futurists from Melbourne and Brisbane in Australia. Go to Emergent Futures to see more or follow on Twitter at FuturistPaul . If you right click on the pictures, titles or links in these posts you will be able to go to the original story on the web. If you click on comments for each post you can either read what others have said or add your own comment via Disqus. If you click on the date of a post it will take you to a single post view where you can copy the web link if you want to send it to someone else. If you click on the tags it will take you to other stories from Emergent Futures with the same tag.

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

iPavement Puts a World of Knowledge Beneath Your Feet

Constructed of a calcium carbonate stone, iPavement looks like your average piece of square tile. But one should never judge a tile by its cover. At iPavement’s core is a 5GB microprocessor that can support both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Each tile will also come with its own suite of apps, offering users features like coupons to local businesses and maps to nearby places of interest. Via Inteligente’s ultimate goal is to make cities more accessible and interesting by linking iPavement squares to people’s increasing number of handheld devices.

» via GOOD

Sensors and computers will turn up everywhere and connect everything in the physical world to the digital world… Even under your feet!

Posted at 1:52pm and tagged with: internet of things, tech, technology, wireless, location,.

futuramb:

infoneer-pulse:

iPavement Puts a World of Knowledge Beneath Your Feet

Constructed of a calcium carbonate stone, iPavement looks like your average piece of square tile. But one should never judge a tile by its cover. At iPavement’s core is a 5GB microprocessor that can support both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Each tile will also come with its own suite of apps, offering users features like coupons to local businesses and maps to nearby places of interest. Via Inteligente’s ultimate goal is to make cities more accessible and interesting by linking iPavement squares to people’s increasing number of handheld devices.

» via GOOD

Sensors and computers will turn up everywhere and connect everything in the physical world to the digital world… Even under your feet!

smarterplanet:

World’s First City-Wide White Space Network Launched - Tech Europe - WSJ

The world’s first city-wide white-space network has been unveiled today in Cambridge, England.

Neul, which has been part of a trial of the technology in Cambridge, said the trial had been a success. According to Glenn Collinson, Neul’s co-founder, the company was moving to a pre-commercial phase this year with a view to a full commercial roll out in 2013. “The network is aimed squarely at ‘the Internet of things’ applications, machine to machine communication,” he said. “We see a whole host of things being enabled by this in smart cities.”

White space is the unused and underused parts of the wireless spectrum. For example, around the world many TV channels are left vacant in most locations. One of the issues had been whether there would be interference in the remaining TV frequencies. The trial established it was possible to keep them apart.

Other potential uses of the freed-up spectrum was as an alternative way of providing mobile broadband connectivity. Mr. Collinson said this was not on offer.

One of the first uses of the network will be smart electricity meters. This is the first step toward smart electricity grids that will allow electricity supply to be matched more efficiently to real-time demand.

“We see that as the first of many smart applications, starting in Cambridge, but spreading out to other cities.” Mr. Collinson would not say which cities were next, but did say there would be announcements about a city in North America and one in Asia.

Posted at 4:40am and tagged with: wireless, internet of things, tech, technology,.

smarterplanet:

World’s First City-Wide White Space Network Launched - Tech Europe - WSJ
The world’s first city-wide white-space network has been unveiled today in Cambridge, England.
Neul, which has been part of a trial of the technology in Cambridge, said the trial had been a success. According to Glenn Collinson, Neul’s co-founder, the company was moving to a pre-commercial phase this year with a view to a full commercial roll out in 2013. “The network is aimed squarely at ‘the Internet of things’ applications, machine to machine communication,” he said. “We see a whole host of things being enabled by this in smart cities.”
White space is the unused and underused parts of the wireless spectrum. For example, around the world many TV channels are left vacant in most locations. One of the issues had been whether there would be interference in the remaining TV frequencies. The trial established it was possible to keep them apart.
Other potential uses of the freed-up spectrum was as an alternative way of providing mobile broadband connectivity. Mr. Collinson said this was not on offer.
One of the first uses of the network will be smart electricity meters. This is the first step toward smart electricity grids that will allow electricity supply to be matched more efficiently to real-time demand.
“We see that as the first of many smart applications, starting in Cambridge, but spreading out to other cities.” Mr. Collinson would not say which cities were next, but did say there would be announcements about a city in North America and one in Asia.

brit:

Wouldn’t it be nice if your body sent you a text message reminding you to take your daily medication? These brand new microchip-implanted pills do just that, and more. Read on for the full story.

Posted at 12:00pm and tagged with: tech, technology, wireless, health,.

brit:

Wouldn’t it be nice if your body sent you a text message reminding you to take your daily medication? These brand new microchip-implanted pills do just that, and more. Read on for the full story.

Sony develops power outlet that can recognize devices and users

Sony has developed a power outlet that can identify devices plugged into it, as well as individuals using the plug. The company says such technology could allow the electricity usage of individual devices to be monitored so non-essential devices could be switched off remotely in the event of limited electricity supply, or for the billing of customers charging their electric vehicles or mobile devices in public places.


Full Story: Gizmag

Posted at 3:40pm and tagged with: tech, technology, energy, wireless, personalisation,.

Sony develops power outlet that can recognize devices and users


Sony has developed a power outlet that can identify devices plugged into it, as well as individuals using the plug. The company says such technology could allow the electricity usage of individual devices to be monitored so non-essential devices could be switched off remotely in the event of limited electricity supply, or for the billing of customers charging their electric vehicles or mobile devices in public places.

Full Story: Gizmag

smarterplanet:

A team of researchers in Germany has created a new way to overcome many of the issues associated with bringing high-speed digital communications across challenging terrain and into remote areas, commonly referred to as the “last mile” problem. The researchers developed a record-speed wireless data bridge that transmits digital information much faster than today’s state-of-the-art systems.

These unprecedented speeds, up to 20 billion bits of data per second, were achieved by using higher frequencies than those typically used in mobile communications—the wireless bridge operates at 200 gigahertz (GHz) (two orders of magnitude greater than cell phone frequencies).

via singularitarian:

Posted at 6:07pm and tagged with: Tech, Technology, Trends, Wireless,.

smarterplanet:

In late 2010, Verizon rolled out its 4G LTE network, which offers data speeds 10 times as fast as 3G networks. But as mobile data traffic continues to grow—experts anticipate that it will increase 26-fold in the next three years—it’s unlikely that any network will be able to keep up. Fortunately, something else is set to happen over the next three years: Wi-Fi could become as ubiquitous and easy to access as cellular is now.

Wi-Fi is up to 15 times as fast as LTE, but at this point it’s an unrealistic substitute for cell service. Connecting is not a standard process. Users need to log into access points individually, enter passwords, and go through other credentialing rigmarole. And range is limited; once logged in, a user can’t wander more than a few hundred feet from an indoor router. But such limitations will soon be gone.

Later this year, the Wi-Fi Alliance, a consortium that oversees Wi-Fi certification and testing, will release the Wi-Fi Certified Passpoint standard to automate logins. Based on the IEEE 802.11u protocol, Passpoint will allow devices to identify preferred hotspots, connect to them, enter passwords, and authenticate security credentials—all automatically. Users may be able to add Passpoint access to their cellphone plans or sign up for standalone service through another provider, such as Boingo, a company that serves 400,000 hotspots at locations like malls and restaurants. When users with Passpoint walk into a coffee shop or arrive at an airport, their phones will automatically connect with the network.

» via infoneer-pulse: Popular Science

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: mobile, tech, technology, wireless,.

smarterplanet:

Connected Cars: How to Accelerate Mainstream Adoption | Mashable

Every so often, the media tells us about an automotive manufacturer on the cusp of delivering wireless, cooperative systems. The reader immediately thinks of Knight Rider, and wanders through a fantasy of connected car heaven.

However, this type of news is often miles from accurate; connected car offerings in the near-to-distant future are a different reality. This article examines the delays behind that “nearly done” automotive technology, and analyzes the value of our research dollars.

In 2005, several automakers introduced cooperative, wireless systems at the Intelligent Transportation Society World Congress in the parking lot of the San Francisco Giants’s then SBC Park. Messages were sent vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure via dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) or, as it would later be renamed, “IEEE 802.11p (5.9 GHz).”

Most of the applications were safety-related systems that offered a seemingly futuristic understanding of position, speed and road conditions. But that was six long years ago – so, what has changed? Apart from the Giants stadium name-change, not much. Technology is no closer to the marketplace. Let’s explore why.

Posted at 5:54am and tagged with: technology, tech, transport, wireless, internet,.

smarterplanet:

Connected Cars: How to Accelerate Mainstream Adoption | Mashable
Every so often, the media tells us about an automotive manufacturer  on the cusp of delivering wireless, cooperative systems. The reader  immediately thinks of Knight Rider, and wanders through a fantasy of connected car heaven.
However, this type of news is often miles from accurate; connected  car offerings in the near-to-distant future are a different reality.  This article examines the delays behind that “nearly done” automotive  technology, and analyzes the value of our research dollars.
In 2005, several automakers introduced cooperative, wireless systems at the Intelligent Transportation Society World Congress in the parking lot of the San Francisco Giants’s then SBC Park. Messages were sent vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure via dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) or, as it would later be renamed, “IEEE 802.11p (5.9 GHz).”
Most of the applications were safety-related systems that offered a  seemingly futuristic understanding of position, speed and road  conditions. But that was six long years ago – so, what has changed?  Apart from the Giants stadium name-change, not much. Technology is no  closer to the marketplace. Let’s explore why.

smarterplanet:

Cufflinks with Wi-Fi hot spot turn you into a digital 007 | CNET

These silver oval ‘links keep your cuffs together without the embarrassment of using some silly analog plastic buttons, and also double as a USB thumbdrive with 2GB of storage and an embedded wireless hot spot.

They can be used to share data and Internet access between smartphones, tablets, laptops, and just about anything else that’s USB- or wireless-compatible.

Posted at 1:17pm and tagged with: tech, technology, wireless,.

smarterplanet:

Cufflinks with Wi-Fi hot spot turn you into a digital 007 | CNET
These silver oval ‘links keep your cuffs together without the  embarrassment of using some silly analog plastic buttons, and also  double as a USB thumbdrive with 2GB of storage and an embedded wireless  hot spot.
They can be used to share data and Internet access between smartphones, tablets, laptops, and just about anything else that’s USB- or wireless-compatible.